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Monoclonal Antibody Immunofluorescence Immunocytochemistry Cell Proliferation

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HMGA1, formerly known as HMG-I/Y, belongs to a family of high mobility group proteins that contain an AT-hook DNA binding domain. HMGA proteins are considered architectural transcription factors; they do not have direct transcriptional activation capacity, but instead regulate gene expression by changing DNA conformation through binding to AT-rich regions in the DNA and/or direct interaction with other transcription factors (1,2). HMGA1 is highly expressed during embryogenesis and in embryonic stem cells, but not in fully differentiated adult tissues (2-4). Research studies have shown that HMGA1 is over-expressed in rapidly dividing neoplastic cells and a wide variety of aggressive cancers, including thyroid, colon, breast, pancreas, and prostate (2-4). Investigators have shown that forced expression of HMGA1 induces cellular transformation and an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), while inhibition of HMGA1 expression blocks anchorage-independent cell growth and proliferation of cancer cells, suggesting that HMGA1 contributes to carcinogenesis by inducing and maintaining a de-differentiated, highly proliferative cell state (5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (Sir2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of this family is Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sir2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT6, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, is a nuclear, chromatin-associated protein that promotes the normal maintenance of genome integrity mediated by the base excision repair (BER) pathway (2-4). The BER pathway repairs single-stranded DNA lesions that arise spontaneously from endogenous alkylation, oxidation, and deamination events. SirT6 deficient mice show increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, including the alkylating agents MMS and H2O2 (2). In addition, these mice show genome instability with increased frequency of fragmented chromosomes, detached centromeres, and gaps (2). SirT6 may regulate the BER pathway by deacetylating DNA Polβ or other core components of the pathway (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (HRS) is a ubiquitously expressed, multidomain-containing protein that is tyrosine phosphorylated upon activation of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (1). HRS contains a proline-rich region, which may mediate interactions with SH3 domain-containing proteins (1). Research studies have also demonstrated that HRS possesses a phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate-binding FYVE-type zinc finger domain and a coiled-coil domain that target it to membranes of the endosomal compartment (2-4). HRS also possesses a ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM) that binds ubiquitinated membrane proteins and, in conjunction with Eps15 and STAM proteins of the ESCRT-0 complex, facilitates their sorting through the endosomal compartment for eventual degradation in the lysosome (5-8). Research studies demonstrate that phosphorylation and ubiquitination of HRS play a role in EGFR intracellular trafficking and degradation (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ETS-related gene (ERG) is a member of the E-26 transformation-specific (ETS) family of sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors (1). ERG plays important and highly conserved roles in vertebrate development. Early in embryonic development, ERG is highly expressed in the embryonic mesoderm and endothelium, where it plays a critical role in the formation of the vascular system, urogenital tract and bone development (2,3). Later in embryonic development, ERG functions to regulate the pluripotency of hematopoietic stem cells, endothelial cell homeostasis and angiogenesis (2,4-7). ERG expression is not restricted to development. In adult mouse, ERG is normally expressed in endothelial tissues, including adrenal, cartilage, heart, spleen, lymphatic endothelial and eosinophil cells (8). However, deregulation of ERG activity, often resulting from chromosomal rearrangements, has been implicated and linked to poor prognosis in a number of different cancers. Chromosomal translocations generating EWS/ERG chimeric proteins comprised of the amino-terminal transactivation domain of Ewing’s sarcoma breakpoint region 1 (EWS) and the carboxy-terminal ETS domain of ERG have been identified in 5-10% of Ewing’s sarcoma, an aggressive bone and soft tissue tumor (9). Chromosomal translocations between ERG and TLS/FUS or ERG and ELF4 have been implicated in acute myeloid leukemia (10, 11). Over-expression of ERG, resulting from gene fusion with the androgen-driven promoter of the TMPRSS2 gene, has been identified as a key driver of metastasis and marker for poor prognosis in prostate cancer (12).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: OX40 (TNFRSF4, CD134) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily that regulates T cell activity and immune responses. The OX40 protein contains four cysteine rich domains, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail containing a QEE motif (1,2). OX40 is primarily expressed on activated CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, while the OX40 ligand (OX40L, TNFSF4, CD252) is predominantly expressed on activated antigen presenting cells (3-7). The engagement of OX40 with OX40L leads to the recruitment of TNF receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and results in the formation of a TCR-independent signaling complex. One component of this complex, PKCθ, activates the NF-κB pathway (2,8). OX40 signaling through Akt can also enhance TCR signaling directly (9). Research studies indicate that the OX40L-OX40 pathway is associated with inflammation and autoimmune diseases (10). Additional research studies show that OX40 agonists augment anti-tumor immunity in several cancer types (11,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1; also known as AOF2 and BHC110) is a nuclear amine oxidase homolog that acts as a histone demethylase and transcription cofactor (1). Gene activation and repression is specifically regulated by the methylation state of distinct histone protein lysine residues. For example, methylation of histone H3 at Lys4 facilitates transcriptional activation by coordinating the recruitment of BPTF, a component of the NURF chromatin remodeling complex, and WDR5, a component of multiple histone methyltransferase complexes (2,3). In contrast, methylation of histone H3 at Lys9 facilitates transcriptional repression by recruiting HP1 (4,5). LSD1 is a component of the CoREST transcriptional co-repressor complex that also contains CoREST, CtBP, HDAC1 and HDAC2. As part of this complex, LSD1 demethylates mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 at Lys4 through a FAD-dependent oxidation reaction to facilitate neuronal-specific gene repression in non-neuronal cells (1,6,7). In contrast, LSD1 associates with androgen receptor in human prostate cells to demethylate mono-methyl and di-methyl histone H3 at Lys9 and facilitate androgen receptor-dependent transcriptional activation (8). Therefore, depending on gene context LSD1 can function as either a transcriptional co-repressor or co-activator. LSD1 activity is inhibited by the amine oxidase inhibitors pargyline, deprenyl, clorgyline and tranylcypromine (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Erg-associated protein with SET domain (ESET), also known as SET-domain, bifurcated 1 (SETDB1) protein, is a member of a family of histone lysine methyltransferases, each of which contains a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in Drosophila Su[var]3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins (1). ESET also contains tudor and methyl-CpG-binding domains, which may coordinate binding to methylated histones and methylated DNA, respectively (1). ESET methylates histone H3 Lys9, creating a transcriptionally repressive mark that facilitates gene silencing (1-3). However, unlike SUV39H histone H3 Lys9 methyltransferases, which function mainly in heterochromatin regions such as pericentric heterochromatin, ESET functions mainly in euchromatic regions to repress gene promoters (3). ESET interacts with a variety of proteins, including transcription factors (ERG), histone deacetylases (HDAC1/2), DNA methyltransferases (DNMT3A/B) and transcriptional co-repressors (mSin3A/B, MBD1, KAP-1, the ATFa-associated modulator mAM) (1-6). mAM forms a complex with ESET, stimulating its methyltransferase activity, specifically the conversion of di-methyl to tri-methyl histone H3 Lys9 (2). MBD1 recruits ESET to the CAF-1 complex to facilitate methylation of histone H3 Lys9 during replication-coupled chromatin assembly in S phase (5). DNMT3A recruits ESET to silenced promoters in cancer cells (7). ESET may play a role in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease, since levels of ESET protein and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys9 are both increased in diseased brains (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are involved in maintaining the silenced state of several developmentally regulated genes and contribute to the maintenance of cell identity, cell cycle regulation, and oncogenesis (1,2). Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), a member of this large protein family, contains four conserved regions including domain I, domain II, and a cysteine-rich amino acid stretch that precedes the carboxy-terminal SET domain (3). The SET domain has been linked with histone methyltransferase (HMTase) activity. Moreover, mammalian Ezh2 is a member of a histone deacetylase complex that functions in gene silencing, acting at the level of chromatin structure (4). Ezh2 complexes methylate histone H3 at Lys9 and 27 in vitro, which is thought to be involved in targeting transcriptional regulators to specific loci (5). Ezh2 is deregulated in various tumor types, and its role, both as a primary effector and as a mediator of tumorigenesis, has become a subject of increased interest (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: MNDA (myeloid cell nuclear differentiation antigen) is a transcription factor constitutively expressed in peripheral blood granulocytes and monocytes; low expression is also found in a subset of B cells (1,2). MNDA is a member of the interferon (IFN)-regulated 200 family of genes, which contain one or more copies of a partially conserved domain of 200 amino acid residues thought to mediate protein-protein interaction (3). MNDA may play a role in apoptosis and its expression is reduced in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) (4). MNDA has been proposed to be a marker for nodal marginal zone lymphoma (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is a member of the protein arginine N-methyltransferase (PRMT) family of proteins that catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to a guanidine nitrogen of arginine (1). Though all PRMT proteins catalyze the formation of mono-methyl arginine, Type I PRMTs (PRMT1, 3, 4, and 6) add an additional methyl group to produce an asymmetric di-methyl arginine while Type II PRMTs (PRMT 5 and 7) produce symmetric di-methyl arginine (1). Mono-methyl arginine, but not di-methyl arginine, can be converted to citrulline through deimination catalyzed by enzymes such as PADI4 (2). Most PRMTs, including PRMT1, methylate arginine residues found within glycine-arginine rich (GAR) protein domains, such as RGG, RG, and RXR repeats (1). However, PRMT4/CARM1 and PRMT5 methylate arginine residues within PGM (proline-, glycine-, methionine-rich) motifs (3). PRMT1 methylates Arg3 of histone H4 and cooperates synergistically with p300/CBP to enhance transcriptional activation by nuclear receptor proteins (4-6). In addition, PRMT1 methylates many non-histone proteins, including the orphan nuclear receptor HNF4 (6), components of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) particle (7), the RNA binding protein Sam68 (8), interleukin enhancer-binding factor 3 (ILF3) (9) and interferon-α and β receptors (10). These interactions suggest additional functions in transcriptional regulation, mRNA processing and signal transduction. Alternative mRNA splicing produces three enzymatically active PRMT1 isoforms that differ in their amino-terminal regions (11). PRMT1 is localized to the nucleus or cytoplasm, depending on cell type (12,13), and appears in many distinct protein complexes. ILF3, TIS21 and the leukemia-associated BTG1 proteins bind PRMT1 to regulate its methyltransferase activity (9,14).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Rho family small GTPases, including Rho, Rac and cdc42, act as molecular switches, regulating processes such as cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. They are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which catalyze the exchange of bound GDP for GTP, and inhibited by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), which catalyze the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP. A third level of regulation is provided by the stoichiometric binding of Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (RhoGDI) (1).G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the cell surface signal through heteromeric G proteins to small GTPases such as Rho, which then signal to downstream effector molecules (2). p115 RhoGEF/ArhGEF1 and its family members PDZ-RhoGEF (PRG), and LARG are stimulated by heteromeric G proteins and thus couple signaling from GPCRs to Rho small GTPases (3-6). In a mouse model of asthma, p115 RhoGEF is necessary for T cells to enable airway inflammation and hyperreactivity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Regulation of the E2F family of transcription factors, primarily through the retinoblastoma protein (pRb), is vital for control of cell proliferation and cell death (reviewed in 1). E2F-associated phosphoprotein (EAPP) was identified as an E2F-family binding protein that modulates E2F-regulated transcription and may be required for S phase entry. EAPP is expressed at varied levels in all tissues and cell types examined and its expression is reduced in nocodazole-arrested cells (2). Mass spectrometry studies have identified multiple EAPP phosphorylation sites including Ser109 and Ser111, but biological consequences of EAPP phosphorylation have yet to be elucidated (3-5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: βIG-H3 (TGFBI/RGD-CAP/Kerato-epithelin) is a 683-amino acid secretory protein induced by TGF-β that plays a role in cell adhesion, differentiation, and apoptosis (1-4). βIG-H3 contains an internal cysteine-rich EMI domain followed by four fasciclin-1 domains and a carboxy terminal RGD domain (1,2). It contributes to cell adhesion through interactions with integrins as well as a number of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins including collagen, fibronectin, and laminin (5-7). ECM βIG-H3 is found in a wide variety of tissues (8-12). Mutations in the βIG-H3 gene as well as elevated protein levels are most notably associated with corneal dystrophies (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CBP (CREB-binding protein) and p300 are highly conserved and functionally related transcriptional co-activators that associate with transcriptional regulators and signaling molecules, integrating multiple signal transduction pathways with the transcriptional machinery (1,2). CBP/p300 also contain histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity, allowing them to acetylate histones and other proteins (2). Phosphorylation of p300 at Ser89 by PKC represses its transciptional acitivity, and phosphorylation at the same site by AMPK disrupts the association of p300 with nuclear receptors (3,4). Ser1834 phosphorylation of p300 by Akt disrupts its association with C/EBPβ (5). Growth factors induce phosphorylation of CBP at Ser437, which is required for CBP recruitment to the transcription complex (6). CaM kinase IV phosphorylates CBP at Ser302, which is required for CBP-dependent transcriptional activation in the CNS (7). The role of acetylation of CBP/p300 is of particular interest (2,8). Acetylation of p300 at Lys1499 has been demonstrated to enhance its HAT activity and affect a wide variety of signaling events (9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a 36 amino acid peptide that belongs to the pancreatic polypeptide (PP) family, which also includes peptide YY (PYY) (1). The mature 36-residue NPY is produced from a larger pre-pro 97-residue NPY precursor through a series of cleavage reactions at dibasic sites and C-terminal amidation of the peptide product (2). NPY is widely expressed in the central nervous system (3) and exerts its action through stimulation of 5 different receptors (Y1-Y5) that belong to the G protein-coupled receptor family (4). NPY in the hypothalamus exhibits orexigenic activity through activation of Y1 and Y5 receptors (5). NPY is involved in the control of bone homeostasis, through the regulation of osteoblast activity by Y1 and Y2 receptors (6), and the regulation of testosterone secretion by activating Y1 receptor in testicular vessels (7). Research studies suggest that modulation of NPY activity and signaling represents a potential strategy for the development of appetite control and antiobesity agents (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3, AML2), a member of the Runt family of transcription factors, plays an important role in the suppression of gastric epithelium cell proliferation (1), dorsal root ganglia neurogenesis (2), and T cell differentiation (3,4). RUNX3 is also involved in caspase-3-dependent apoptosis (5). Protein complexes containing RUNX3 and various transcription factors, such as Smads or β-catenin/TCF4, have tumor suppressor activity and regulate downstream target gene transcription (6,7). While typically localized to the nucleus, RUNX3 can be tyrosine phosphorylated and located in the cytoplasm of many cancer cells. This mislocalization of RUNX3 abolishes its tumor suppressor function and contributes to tumorigenesis (8). Research studies indicate that gene silencing or protein mislocalization inactivates RUNX3 in more than 80% of gastric cancers and other cancer types (1,9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: OX40 (TNFRSF4, CD134) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily that regulates T cell activity and immune responses. The OX40 protein contains four cysteine rich domains, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail containing a QEE motif (1,2). OX40 is primarily expressed on activated CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, while the OX40 ligand (OX40L, TNFSF4, CD252) is predominantly expressed on activated antigen presenting cells (3-7). The engagement of OX40 with OX40L leads to the recruitment of TNF receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and results in the formation of a TCR-independent signaling complex. One component of this complex, PKCθ, activates the NF-κB pathway (2,8). OX40 signaling through Akt can also enhance TCR signaling directly (9). Research studies indicate that the OX40L-OX40 pathway is associated with inflammation and autoimmune diseases (10). Additional research studies show that OX40 agonists augment anti-tumor immunity in several cancer types (11,12).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Sine oculis homeobox (SIX) proteins belong to a family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors discovered in Drosophila mutant screens for embryonic eye development genes (1-3). The prototypical family member (sine oculis, so) was named for eyeless embryos carrying mutations in a gene highly conserved among vertebrates, including humans (SIX1) (4). A total of six family members (SIX1-6) have been identified in vertebrates. Each SIX protein contains a homeobox nucleic acid recognition domain (HD) with a DNA-binding helix-turn-helix motif and an adjacent SIX domain, which may be involved in regulating protein-protein interactions (5). In addition to their critical functions during embryonic organogenesis, research studies suggest that SIX proteins play additional roles in postnatal cell cycle regulation, with potentially important implications in tumorigenesis (6,7).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: INDO/IDO1/indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an IFN-γ-inducible enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step of tryptophan degradation (1). IDO is upregulated in many tumors and in dendritic cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes. Elevated tryptophan catabolism in these cells leads to tryptophan starvation of T cells, limiting T cell proliferation and activation (2). Therefore, IDO is considered an immunosuppresive molecule, and research studies have shown that upregulation of IDO is a mechanism of cancer immune evasion (3). The gastrointestinal stromal tumor drug, imatinib, was found to act, in part, by reducing IDO expression, resulting in increased CD8+ T cell activation and induction of apoptosis in regulatory T cells (4). In addition to its enzymatic activity, IDO was recently shown to have signaling capability through an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) that is phosphorylated by Fyn in response to TGF-β. This leads to recruitment of SHP-1 and activation of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway (5).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Galectins are a family of β-galactose binding proteins that are characterized by an affinity for poly-N-acetyllactosamine-enriched glycoconjugates and a carbohydrate-binding site (1,2). Members of the galectin family have been implicated in a variety of biological functions including cell adhesion (3), growth regulation (4), cytokine production (5), T-cell apoptosis (6), and immune responses (7).Galectin-3/LGALS3 is involved in several diverse biological functions. Galectin-3/LGALS3 binds IgE (8). Galectin-3/LGALS3 is an unusual protein in that can be found both extracellularly and intracellularly. Intracellularly, galectin-3/LGALS3 can localize to the cytoplasm, nucleus, or both, depending on cell type and experimental conditions. Nuclear galectin-3/LGALS3 has been identified as a pre-mRNA splicing factor (9). Galectin-3/LGALS3 production has been shown to increase during inflammation and in obesity, and the protein itself can have an inflammatory effect under certain conditions (10). Galectin-3/LGALS3 forms a complex with α3, β1 integrin to act as a surface receptor on endothelial cells for the NG2 proteoglycan, which triggers cell motility and angiogenesis (11). In addition to these functions, galectin-3/LGALS3 is also a required factor for the terminal differentiation of epithelial cells (12).