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Monoclonal Antibody Immunofluorescence Immunocytochemistry Channel Activity

Also showing Monoclonal Antibody Immunofluorescence Immunocytochemistry Protein Channel Activity

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: According to affinity and function, calcium-binding proteins are separated into two classes: calcium buffers and calcium sensors. Calmodulin is a well-studied calcium sensor with well-established roles in synaptic plasticity. Neuronal calcium-sensor 1 (NCS1) is also a member of the calcium sensor family, however, its role in synaptic plasticity remains under investigation. NCS1 contains multiple EF-hand calcium-binding motifs and an amino-terminal myristoyl group (1). NCS1 has a large number of binding partners. Most of these protein interactions are calcium-dependent (e.g. dopamine D2 receptor), although some are calcium-independent (e.g. IP3 receptor) (2). In murine dentate gyrus, NCS1 promotes synaptic plasticity and rapid acquisition of spatial memory (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Anoctamin 1, also called TMEM16A for Transmembrane Member 16A, is a plasma membrane calcium-activated chloride channel (1). It is essential for chloride secretion from epithelial tissues (2), and has been shown to be a specific marker for cells of Cajal (3), the pacemaker cells that control smooth muscle contraction. Anoctamin 1 knockout mice exhibit an altered gastric smooth muscle rhythmic contraction (4). More recently, research studies have identified Anoctamin 1 as a heat sensor in nociceptive neurons (5). Heat above 44ºC triggers anoctamin 1-dependent depolarization, contributing to the mediation of thermal nociception (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CFTR (ABC35, ABCC7, CBAVD, CF, dj760C5.1, MRP7, TNR-CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. Mutations in ABC genes have been linked to many diseases. CFTR is a plasma membrane cyclic AMP activated chloride channel that is expressed in the epithelial cells of the lung and several other organs (1,2). It mediates the secretion of Cl- and also regulates several channels including the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), K+ channels , ATP release mechanisms, anion exchangers, sodium bicarbonate transporters and aquaporin water channels (3,4,5,6,7,8 9,10). Mutations in the CFTR gene cause cystic fibrosis, a disease that is characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, increase in sweat gland NaCl, male infertility and airway disease (1,2,11). Intracellular trafficking regulates the number of CFTR molecules at the cell surface, which in part regulates Cl- secretion. Deletion of phenylalanine 508 (deltaF508) is the most common mutation in CF patients. This mutation results in retention in the ER, where ER quality control mechanisms target the deltaF508 mutant to the proteosome for degradation (12-14). Therefore, disruption of CFTR trafficking leads to disregulation of Cl- secretion at the plasma membrane of epithelial cells.

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Bcl-2 exerts a survival function in response to a wide range of apoptotic stimuli through inhibition of mitochondrial cytochrome c release (1). It has been implicated in modulating mitochondrial calcium homeostasis and proton flux (2). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified within Bcl-2 including Thr56, Ser70, Thr74, and Ser87 (3). It has been suggested that these phosphorylation sites may be targets of the ASK1/MKK7/JNK1 pathway and that phosphorylation of Bcl-2 may be a marker for mitotic events (4,5). Mutation of Bcl-2 at Thr56 or Ser87 inhibits its anti-apoptotic activity during glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of T lymphocytes (6). Interleukin-3 and JNK-induced Bcl-2 phosphorylation at Ser70 may be required for its enhanced anti-apoptotic functions (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family originally isolated from the ML-1 human myeloid leukemia cell line during phorbol ester-induced differentiation along the monocyte/macrophage pathway (1). Similar to other Bcl-2 family members, Mcl-1 localizes to the mitochondria (2), interacts with and antagonizes pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members (3), and inhibits apoptosis induced by a number of cytotoxic stimuli (4). Mcl-1 differs from its other family members in its regulation at both the transcriptional and post-translational level. First, Mcl-1 has an extended amino-terminal PEST region, which is responsible for its relatively short half-life (1,2). Second, unlike other family members, Mcl-1 is rapidly transcribed via a PI3K/Akt dependent pathway, resulting in its increased expression during myeloid differentiation and cytokine stimulation (1,5-7). Mcl-1 is phosphorylated in response to treatment with phorbol ester, microtubule-damaging agents, oxidative stress, and cytokine withdrawal (8-11). Phosphorylation at Thr163, the conserved MAP kinase/ERK site located within the PEST region, slows Mcl-1 protein turnover (10) but may prime the GSK-3 mediated phosphorylation at Ser159 that leads to Mcl-1 destabilization (11). Mcl-1 deficiency in mice results in peri-implantation lethality (12). In addition, conditional disruption of the corresponding mcl-1 gene shows that Mcl-1 plays an important role in early lymphoid development and in the maintenance of mature lymphocytes (13).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: GAS6 (Growth Arrest Specific gene 6) is a vitamin K-dependent ligand of the TAM (Tyro3, Axl and MerTK) RTK family. It has an N-terminal Gla domain containing multiple Asp gamma-carboxylation sites, followed by four EGF repeats and two C-terminal LG domains. Vitamin K mediates multiple gamma-carboxylations of glutamic acid residues in the GAS6 Gla domain. These modifications are required for GAS6 to to activate its receptor (1,2). The two C-terminal LG (SHBG) domains form a V-shaped structure and provide a direct binding site for receptor interaction. Among the TAM family members, GAS6 has high affinity for Axl and low affinity for Tyro3 and MerTK. Ligand/receptor interaction activates multiple downstream signaling pathways such as PI3K/AKT, STAT/SOCS, PLC/FAK, and Grb2/RAS, and promotes cell survival, proliferation, migration and differentiation (3,4). GAS6 has been implicated in cancer development and immune-related disorders (inflammation and multiple sclerosis), and as such has been identified as a potential therapeutic target (3-6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a 36 amino acid peptide that belongs to the pancreatic polypeptide (PP) family, which also includes peptide YY (PYY) (1). The mature 36-residue NPY is produced from a larger pre-pro 97-residue NPY precursor through a series of cleavage reactions at dibasic sites and C-terminal amidation of the peptide product (2). NPY is widely expressed in the central nervous system (3) and exerts its action through stimulation of 5 different receptors (Y1-Y5) that belong to the G protein-coupled receptor family (4). NPY in the hypothalamus exhibits orexigenic activity through activation of Y1 and Y5 receptors (5). NPY is involved in the control of bone homeostasis, through the regulation of osteoblast activity by Y1 and Y2 receptors (6), and the regulation of testosterone secretion by activating Y1 receptor in testicular vessels (7). Research studies suggest that modulation of NPY activity and signaling represents a potential strategy for the development of appetite control and antiobesity agents (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ca2+ is a key second messenger in many intracellular signaling pathways. Ca2+ signals control many cellular functions ranging from short-term responses such as contraction and secretion to longer-term regulation of cell growth and proliferation (1,2). Stromal interaction molecules (STIMs) function as Ca2+ sensors that detect changes in Ca2+ content in intracellular Ca2+ stores (3). STIM1 is conserved, ubiquitously expressed, and functions as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ sensor that migrates from the ER Ca2+ store to the plasma membrane where it activates calcium-release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels when the ER Ca2+ store is low (4). STIM1 is a potential tumor suppressor; defects in STIM1 may cause rhabdomyosarcoma and rhabdoid tumors (5). STIM1 can either homodimerize or form heterodimers with STIM2. STIM2 possesses a high sequence identity to STIM1 and can function as an inhibitor of STIM1-mediated plasma membrane store-operated Ca2+ entry (6). However, further investigation is required to elucidate the true physiological function of STIM2.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The protein inhibitor of activated Stat (PIAS) proteins, which include PIAS1, PIAS3, PIASx, and PIASy, were originally characterized based on their interaction with the Stat family of transcription factors (1,2). PIAS1, PIAS3, and PIASx interact with and repress Stat1, Stat3, and Stat4, respectively (1-3). Deletion of PIAS1 leads to inhibition of interferon-inducible genes and increased protection against infection (4). The PIAS family contains a conserved RING domain that has been linked to a function as a small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) ligase, coupling the SUMO conjugating enzyme Ubc9 with its substrate proteins (5,6). Numerous studies have now shown that PIAS family members can regulate the activity of transcription factors through distinct mechanisms, including NF-κB (7,8), c-Jun, p53 (5,9), Oct-4 (10), and Smads (11,12). The activity of PIAS1 is regulated by both phosphorylation and arginine methylation. Inflammatory stimuli can induce IKK-mediated phosphorylation of PIAS1 at Ser90, which is required for its activity (13). In addition, PRMT1 induces arginine methylation of PIAS1 at Arg303 following interferon treatment and is associated with its repressive activity on Stat1 (14).