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Monoclonal Antibody Immunofluorescence Immunocytochemistry Myoblast Fusion

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Myoblast determination protein 1 (MyoD1), also called myogenic factor 3 (Myf3), is a member of the MyoD family of muscle specific bHLH transcription factors (1). This family is responsible for controlling specification of the muscle cell lineage and members are expressed only in skeletal muscle and its precursors. MyoD1 is considered a master regulator of skeletal myogenesis as its expression can induce myogenic differentiation in myoblasts, fibroblasts, and a variety of other cell types (2,3). Through ChIP-sequencing experiments, researchers have discovered that MyoD is associated with the promoters of many genes in muscle cells, but it only regulates a subset of those genes. These research studies point to regulation of MyoD transcriptional activity via epigenetic mechanisms involving SWI/SNF complexes and Polycomb and Trithorax Group proteins (4-6). Additional influences on muscle development include signal transduction through MAPK, PI3K/Akt, myostatin, NF-κB, and mTOR signaling pathways (5-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) was initially identified as an enzyme that regulates glycogen synthesis in response to insulin (1). GSK-3 is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine protein kinase that phosphorylates and inactivates glycogen synthase. GSK-3 is a critical downstream element of the PI3K/Akt cell survival pathway whose activity can be inhibited by Akt-mediated phosphorylation at Ser21 of GSK-3α and Ser9 of GSK-3β (2,3). GSK-3 has been implicated in the regulation of cell fate in Dictyostelium and is a component of the Wnt signaling pathway required for Drosophila, Xenopus, and mammalian development (4). GSK-3 has been shown to regulate cyclin D1 proteolysis and subcellular localization (5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) was initially identified as an enzyme that regulates glycogen synthesis in response to insulin (1). GSK-3 is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine protein kinase that phosphorylates and inactivates glycogen synthase. GSK-3 is a critical downstream element of the PI3K/Akt cell survival pathway whose activity can be inhibited by Akt-mediated phosphorylation at Ser21 of GSK-3α and Ser9 of GSK-3β (2,3). GSK-3 has been implicated in the regulation of cell fate in Dictyostelium and is a component of the Wnt signaling pathway required for Drosophila, Xenopus, and mammalian development (4). GSK-3 has been shown to regulate cyclin D1 proteolysis and subcellular localization (5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Nonmuscle myosin is an actin-based motor protein essential to cell motility, cell division, migration, adhesion, and polarity. The holoenzyme consists of two identical heavy chains and two sets of light chains. The light chains (MLCs) regulate myosin II activity and stability. The heavy chains (NMHCs) are encoded by three genes, MYH9, MYH10, and MYH14, which generate three different nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, IIa, IIb, and IIc, respectively (reviewed in 1). While all three isoforms perform the same enzymatic tasks, binding to and contracting actin filaments coupled to ATP hydrolysis, their cellular functions do not appear to be redundant and they have different subcellular distributions (2-5). The carboxy-terminal tail domain of myosin II is important in isoform-specific subcellular localization (6). Research studies have shown that phosphorylation of myosin IIa at Ser1943 contributes to the regulation of breast cancer cell migration (7).

$134
20 µl
$336
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) was initially identified as an enzyme that regulates glycogen synthesis in response to insulin (1). GSK-3 is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine protein kinase that phosphorylates and inactivates glycogen synthase. GSK-3 is a critical downstream element of the PI3K/Akt cell survival pathway whose activity can be inhibited by Akt-mediated phosphorylation at Ser21 of GSK-3α and Ser9 of GSK-3β (2,3). GSK-3 has been implicated in the regulation of cell fate in Dictyostelium and is a component of the Wnt signaling pathway required for Drosophila, Xenopus, and mammalian development (4). GSK-3 has been shown to regulate cyclin D1 proteolysis and subcellular localization (5).

$122
20 µl
$307
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) was initially identified as an enzyme that regulates glycogen synthesis in response to insulin (1). GSK-3 is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine protein kinase that phosphorylates and inactivates glycogen synthase. GSK-3 is a critical downstream element of the PI3K/Akt cell survival pathway whose activity can be inhibited by Akt-mediated phosphorylation at Ser21 of GSK-3α and Ser9 of GSK-3β (2,3). GSK-3 has been implicated in the regulation of cell fate in Dictyostelium and is a component of the Wnt signaling pathway required for Drosophila, Xenopus, and mammalian development (4). GSK-3 has been shown to regulate cyclin D1 proteolysis and subcellular localization (5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The annexin superfamily consists of 13 calcium or calcium and phospholipid binding proteins with high biological and structural homology (1). Annexin-1 (ANXA1) is the first characterized member of the annexin family of proteins and is able to bind to cellular membranes in a calcium-dependent manner, promoting membrane fusion and endocytosis (2-4). Annexin A1 has anti-inflammatory properties and inhibits phospholipase A2 activity (5,6). Annexin A1 can accumulate on internalized vesicles after EGF-stimulated endocytosis and may be required for a late stage in inward vesiculation (7). Phosphorylation by PKC, EGFR, and Chak1 results in inhibition of annexin A1 function (8-10). Annexin A1 has also been identified as one of the 'eat-me' signals on apoptotic cells that are to be recognized and ingested by phagocytes (11). Annexin A1, as an endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator, has roles in many diverse cellular functions, such as membrane aggregation, inflammation, phagocytosis, proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis and cancer development (12-14).