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Monoclonal Antibody Immunoprecipitation Positive Regulation of Protein Secretion

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1a) belongs to the IL-1 family of cytokines with 11 members including IL-1b. IL-1a is expressed in many cell types of both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origins under steady state, and its expression can be increased in response to appropriate stimuli (1,2). Like IL-1b, IL-1a is also synthesized as a precursor (pro-IL-1a) and can be cleaved into smaller mature forms. However, both pro-IL-1a and the cleaved form of IL-1a are biologically active and can activate the signaling pathway through the membrane receptor IL-1R1. IL-1a is active both as a secreted form and as a membrane-bound form. Due to such characteristics, passive leakage of IL-1a from dying cells can activate inflammation, leading some researchers to consider IL-1a as a key “alarmin in the cell” that alerts the host to damage or injury (3,4). In addition, IL-1a can also enter the nucleus to modulate transcription (5,6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) is a member of the dynamin superfamily of GTPases. Members of this family have diverse cellular functions including vesicle scission, organelle fission, viral resistance, and intracellular trafficking (reviewed in 1). DRP1 affects mitochondrial morphology and is important in mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission in mammalian cells (2-5). The yeast ortholog of DRP1 clusters into a spiral-shaped structure on the mitochondrial membrane at the site of fission (reviewed in 6), and this structure is likely conserved in mammalian cells (3). The division of the mitochondria, which is required for apoptosis, as well as normal cell growth and development is controlled, in part, by the phosphorylation of DRP1 at Ser616 by Cdk1/cyclin B and at Ser637 by protein kinase A (PKA) (reviewed in 6). When phosphorylated at Ser616, DRP1 stimulates mitochondrial fission during mitosis. Conversely, fission is inhibited when DRP1 is phosphorylated at Ser637 (reviewed in 6). Dephosphorylation at Ser637 by calcineurin reverses this inhibition (7). In addition to phosphorylation, sumoylation of DRP1 is also an enhancer of mitochondrial fission (8). Balancing fission and fusion events is essential for proper mitochondrial function. Research studies have demonstrated mitochondrial defects in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease (reviewed in 6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) is a member of the dynamin superfamily of GTPases. Members of this family have diverse cellular functions including vesicle scission, organelle fission, viral resistance, and intracellular trafficking (reviewed in 1). DRP1 affects mitochondrial morphology and is important in mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission in mammalian cells (2-5). The yeast ortholog of DRP1 clusters into a spiral-shaped structure on the mitochondrial membrane at the site of fission (reviewed in 6), and this structure is likely conserved in mammalian cells (3). The division of the mitochondria, which is required for apoptosis, as well as normal cell growth and development is controlled, in part, by the phosphorylation of DRP1 at Ser616 by Cdk1/cyclin B and at Ser637 by protein kinase A (PKA) (reviewed in 6). When phosphorylated at Ser616, DRP1 stimulates mitochondrial fission during mitosis. Conversely, fission is inhibited when DRP1 is phosphorylated at Ser637 (reviewed in 6). Dephosphorylation at Ser637 by calcineurin reverses this inhibition (7). In addition to phosphorylation, sumoylation of DRP1 is also an enhancer of mitochondrial fission (8). Balancing fission and fusion events is essential for proper mitochondrial function. Research studies have demonstrated mitochondrial defects in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease (reviewed in 6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) were first identified as molecules that can induce ectopic bone and cartilage formation (1,2). BMPs belong to the TGF-β superfamily, playing many diverse functions during development (3). BMPs are synthesized as precursor proteins and then processed by cleavage to release the C-terminal mature BMP. BMPs initiate signaling by binding to a receptor complex containing type I and type II serine/threonine receptor kinases that then phosphorylate Smad (mainly Smad1, 5, and 8), resulting in the translocation of Smad into the nucleus. BMP was also reported to activate MAPK pathways in some systems (3,4).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CBP (CREB-binding protein) and p300 are highly conserved and functionally related transcriptional co-activators that associate with transcriptional regulators and signaling molecules, integrating multiple signal transduction pathways with the transcriptional machinery (1,2). CBP/p300 also contain histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity, allowing them to acetylate histones and other proteins (2). Phosphorylation of p300 at Ser89 by PKC represses its transciptional acitivity, and phosphorylation at the same site by AMPK disrupts the association of p300 with nuclear receptors (3,4). Ser1834 phosphorylation of p300 by Akt disrupts its association with C/EBPβ (5). Growth factors induce phosphorylation of CBP at Ser437, which is required for CBP recruitment to the transcription complex (6). CaM kinase IV phosphorylates CBP at Ser302, which is required for CBP-dependent transcriptional activation in the CNS (7). The role of acetylation of CBP/p300 is of particular interest (2,8). Acetylation of p300 at Lys1499 has been demonstrated to enhance its HAT activity and affect a wide variety of signaling events (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CBP (CREB-binding protein) and p300 are highly conserved and functionally related transcriptional co-activators that associate with transcriptional regulators and signaling molecules, integrating multiple signal transduction pathways with the transcriptional machinery (1,2). CBP/p300 also contain histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity, allowing them to acetylate histones and other proteins (2). Phosphorylation of p300 at Ser89 by PKC represses its transciptional acitivity, and phosphorylation at the same site by AMPK disrupts the association of p300 with nuclear receptors (3,4). Ser1834 phosphorylation of p300 by Akt disrupts its association with C/EBPβ (5). Growth factors induce phosphorylation of CBP at Ser437, which is required for CBP recruitment to the transcription complex (6). CaM kinase IV phosphorylates CBP at Ser302, which is required for CBP-dependent transcriptional activation in the CNS (7). The role of acetylation of CBP/p300 is of particular interest (2,8). Acetylation of p300 at Lys1499 has been demonstrated to enhance its HAT activity and affect a wide variety of signaling events (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CBP (CREB-binding protein) and p300 are highly conserved and functionally related transcriptional co-activators that associate with transcriptional regulators and signaling molecules, integrating multiple signal transduction pathways with the transcriptional machinery (1,2). CBP/p300 also contain histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity, allowing them to acetylate histones and other proteins (2). Phosphorylation of p300 at Ser89 by PKC represses its transciptional acitivity, and phosphorylation at the same site by AMPK disrupts the association of p300 with nuclear receptors (3,4). Ser1834 phosphorylation of p300 by Akt disrupts its association with C/EBPβ (5). Growth factors induce phosphorylation of CBP at Ser437, which is required for CBP recruitment to the transcription complex (6). CaM kinase IV phosphorylates CBP at Ser302, which is required for CBP-dependent transcriptional activation in the CNS (7). The role of acetylation of CBP/p300 is of particular interest (2,8). Acetylation of p300 at Lys1499 has been demonstrated to enhance its HAT activity and affect a wide variety of signaling events (9).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: OX40 (TNFRSF4, CD134) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily that regulates T cell activity and immune responses. The OX40 protein contains four cysteine rich domains, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail containing a QEE motif (1,2). OX40 is primarily expressed on activated CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, while the OX40 ligand (OX40L, TNFSF4, CD252) is predominantly expressed on activated antigen presenting cells (3-7). The engagement of OX40 with OX40L leads to the recruitment of TNF receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and results in the formation of a TCR-independent signaling complex. One component of this complex, PKCθ, activates the NF-κB pathway (2,8). OX40 signaling through Akt can also enhance TCR signaling directly (9). Research studies indicate that the OX40L-OX40 pathway is associated with inflammation and autoimmune diseases (10). Additional research studies show that OX40 agonists augment anti-tumor immunity in several cancer types (11,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: OX40 (TNFRSF4, CD134) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily that regulates T cell activity and immune responses. The OX40 protein contains four cysteine rich domains, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail containing a QEE motif (1,2). OX40 is primarily expressed on activated CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, while the OX40 ligand (OX40L, TNFSF4, CD252) is predominantly expressed on activated antigen presenting cells (3-7). The engagement of OX40 with OX40L leads to the recruitment of TNF receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and results in the formation of a TCR-independent signaling complex. One component of this complex, PKCθ, activates the NF-κB pathway (2,8). OX40 signaling through Akt can also enhance TCR signaling directly (9). Research studies indicate that the OX40L-OX40 pathway is associated with inflammation and autoimmune diseases (10). Additional research studies show that OX40 agonists augment anti-tumor immunity in several cancer types (11,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Neogenin is a member of the Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC) receptor family. It acts as an attractive axon guidance receptor in response to netrin, and as a repellent receptor when interacting with RGMa (1,2). Neogenin also regulates adhesion and tissue organization, such as bone formation, mammary gland morphogenesis, and skeletal myofiber development, by interacting with secreted netrins (3-5). In addition, neogenin is a key regulator of adult neurogenesis by synchronizing neuroblast migration and differentiation (6). Neogenin expression has been found to be associated with cellular phenotype in cancer. In breast cancer, neogenin expression is inversely correlated with cancer grade (7), while in gastric cancer, up regulation of neogenin was found to increase cell proliferation and motility (8).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: OX40 (TNFRSF4, CD134) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily that regulates T cell activity and immune responses. The OX40 protein contains four cysteine rich domains, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail containing a QEE motif (1,2). OX40 is primarily expressed on activated CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, while the OX40 ligand (OX40L, TNFSF4, CD252) is predominantly expressed on activated antigen presenting cells (3-7). The engagement of OX40 with OX40L leads to the recruitment of TNF receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and results in the formation of a TCR-independent signaling complex. One component of this complex, PKCθ, activates the NF-κB pathway (2,8). OX40 signaling through Akt can also enhance TCR signaling directly (9). Research studies indicate that the OX40L-OX40 pathway is associated with inflammation and autoimmune diseases (10). Additional research studies show that OX40 agonists augment anti-tumor immunity in several cancer types (11,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: P2X purinergic receptors are ATP-gated ion channels involved in physiological processes that include inflammation, afferent sensory signaling, and sympathetic motor nerve activity. Seven different vertebrate genes (P2RX1-P2RX7) encode for individual receptor protein subunits (1). All P2X subunit proteins share similar protein domain structure, but can differ in overall protein length from 384 to 595 amino acids. Each P2X subunit is composed of amino- and carboxy-terminal intracellular domains, two transmembrane domains, and a large extracellular loop that contains ten evenly spaced cysteines and multiple glycosylation sites (2). P2X receptors are found in a variety of cell types and tissues, including central and peripheral nervous system neurons and glial cells, autonomic and sensory neurons, bone, muscle, and hematopoietic tissues (1).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-1, or interleukin-1ß converting enzyme (ICE/ICEα), is a class I cysteine protease, which also includes caspases -4, -5, -11, and -12. Caspase-1 cleaves inflammatory cytokines such as pro-IL-1ß and interferon-γ inducing factor (IL-18) into their mature forms (1,2). Like other caspases, caspase-1 is proteolytically activated from a proenzyme to produce a tetramer of its two active subunits, p20 and p10. Caspase-1 has a large amino-terminal pro-domain that contains a caspase recruitment domain (CARD). Overexpression of caspase-1 can induce apoptosis (3). Mice deficient in caspase-1, however, have no overt defects in apoptosis but do have defects in the maturation of pro-IL-1β and are resistant to endotoxic shock (4,5). At least six caspase-1 isoforms have been identified, including caspase-1 α, β, γ, δ, ε and ζ (6). Most caspase-1 isoforms (α, β, γ and δ) produce products between 30-48 kDa and induce apoptosis upon over-expression. Caspase-1 ε typically contains only the p10 subunit, does not induce apoptosis and may act as a dominant negative. The widely expressed ζ isoform of caspase-1 induces apoptosis and lacks 39 amino-terminal residues found in the α isoform (6). Activation of caspase-1 occurs through an oligomerization molecular platform designated the "inflammasome" that includes caspase-5, Pycard/Asc, and NALP1 (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-1, or interleukin-1ß converting enzyme (ICE/ICEα), is a class I cysteine protease, which also includes caspases -4, -5, -11, and -12. Caspase-1 cleaves inflammatory cytokines such as pro-IL-1ß and interferon-γ inducing factor (IL-18) into their mature forms (1,2). Like other caspases, caspase-1 is proteolytically activated from a proenzyme to produce a tetramer of its two active subunits, p20 and p10. Caspase-1 has a large amino-terminal pro-domain that contains a caspase recruitment domain (CARD). Overexpression of caspase-1 can induce apoptosis (3). Mice deficient in caspase-1, however, have no overt defects in apoptosis but do have defects in the maturation of pro-IL-1β and are resistant to endotoxic shock (4,5). At least six caspase-1 isoforms have been identified, including caspase-1 α, β, γ, δ, ε and ζ (6). Most caspase-1 isoforms (α, β, γ and δ) produce products between 30-48 kDa and induce apoptosis upon over-expression. Caspase-1 ε typically contains only the p10 subunit, does not induce apoptosis and may act as a dominant negative. The widely expressed ζ isoform of caspase-1 induces apoptosis and lacks 39 amino-terminal residues found in the α isoform (6). Activation of caspase-1 occurs through an oligomerization molecular platform designated the "inflammasome" that includes caspase-5, Pycard/Asc, and NALP1 (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) is an interferon-inducible protein containing an amino-terminal pyrin domain and carboxy-terminal HIN-200 domain that functions in innate immunity and tumor progression (1). Expression of AIM2 can inhibit cell growth and tumor formation (2,3). Furthermore, the AIM2 gene has a high frequency of mutations associated with microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancers (4). AIM2 has a critical role in the activation of caspase-1, the protease responsible for the processing of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. Caspase-1 activation is regulated by multi-protein complexes referred to as “inflammasomes” (5,6). Distinct inflammasome complexes have been described containing NLRP1/NALP1, NLRP3/NALP3, IPAF, and AIM2. The HIN-200 domain of AIM2 is responsible for binding to cytoplasmic double stranded DNA, resulting in caspase-1 activation. (7-9). This inflammasome complex also involves binding of the pyrin domain of AIM2 to the CARD-domain protein ASC/TMS1, which then interacts directly with caspase-1. As a result, AIM2 has been demonstrated to be an important sensor for a number of different pathogens (10-12).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-Synuclein is a protein of 140-amino acids expressed abundantly in the brain. α-Synuclein is also the main component of pathogenic Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Research studies have shown that mutations of the α-synuclein gene are linked to Parkinson's disease (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SHP-2 (PTPN11) is a ubiquitously expressed, nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP). It participates in signaling events downstream of receptors for growth factors, cytokines, hormones, antigens, and extracellular matrices in the control of cell growth, differentiation, migration, and death (1). Activation of SHP-2 and its association with Gab1 is critical for sustained Erk activation downstream of several growth factor receptors and cytokines (2). In addition to its role in Gab1-mediated Erk activation, SHP-2 attenuates EGF-dependent PI3 kinase activation by dephosphorylating Gab1 at p85 binding sites (3). SHP-2 becomes phosphorylated at Tyr542 and Tyr580 in its carboxy-terminus in response to growth factor receptor activation (4). These phosphorylation events are thought to relieve basal inhibition and stimulate SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase activity (5). Mutations in the corresponding gene result in a pair of clinically similar disorders (Noonan syndrome and LEOPARD syndrome) that may result from abnormal MAPK regulation (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF1/CXCL12) is a small, pro-inflammatory chemoattractant cytokine that regulates leukocyte trafficking through interactions with its cognate 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (1). The SDF1/CXCL12 receptor, CXCR4, also serves as a coreceptor for the entry of human immunodeficiency virus into target cells (2). SDF1/CXCL12 may regulate homing and maintenance of CXCR4-expressing stem or progenitor cells, including embryonic and many somatic stem cells (3,4). Many cancer cells express CXCR4, suggesting that SDF1/CXCL12 plays a role in cancer metastasis (5,6). Alternative splicing and differential processing during maturation produce a pair of SDF1/CXCL12 isoforms (SDF1/CXCL12α and SDF1/CXCL12β) that have different properties and biological activities (7). Additional isoforms of SDF1/CXCL12 have been reported (8,9).