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Monoclonal Antibody Immunoprecipitation Protease Binding

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-3 (CPP-32, Apoptain, Yama, SCA-1) is a critical executioner of apoptosis, as it is either partially or totally responsible for the proteolytic cleavage of many key proteins, such as the nuclear enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) (1). Activation of caspase-3 requires proteolytic processing of its inactive zymogen into activated p17 and p12 fragments. Cleavage of caspase-3 requires the aspartic acid residue at the P1 position (2).

$122
20 µl
$323
100 µl
$755
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Caspase-3 (CPP-32, Apoptain, Yama, SCA-1) is a critical executioner of apoptosis, as it is either partially or totally responsible for the proteolytic cleavage of many key proteins, such as the nuclear enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) (1). Activation of caspase-3 requires proteolytic processing of its inactive zymogen into activated p17 and p12 fragments. Cleavage of caspase-3 requires the aspartic acid residue at the P1 position (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cystatin C (cystatin-3, CST3) belongs to the cystatin type 2 superfamily of cysteine peptidase inhibitors (1). The 146 amino acid cystatin C precursor protein contains a 26 residue, amino-terminal secretory signal sequence. The mature 120 amino acid cystatin C protein contains two disulfide bridges (2,3). Cystatin C is secreted in body fluids and is a marker of kidney (4) and cardiovascular (5) dysfunction. Research studies report of changes in cystatin C levels in the cerebral spinal fluid as well as in specific neuronal cell populations in a number of neurodegenerative diseases (6-8). Interestingly, experimental evidence suggests that cystatin C has protective effects against neurodegeneration, such as inhibition of amyloid-β oligomerization and fibril formation (9,10), induction of autophagy (11), induction of neurogenesis (12), and inhibition of cysteine proteases whose activity has been associated with several neurodegenerative diseases (13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fibroblast activation protein/seprase (FAP) is a cell surface serine integral membrane protease with roles in tissue remodeling during development and wound healing, as well as in cancer and fibrotic disease. FAP has both dipeptidyl peptidase and endopeptidase activities, and cleaves at N-terminal Xaa-Pro sequences. FAP is highly expressed in tumor stroma, and contributes to migration and invasion of tumor cells, as well as that of endothelial cells into the extracellular matrix. FAP is a useful marker of tumorigenic stroma and of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and fibrosis (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Currently, there are five ubiquitin receptors associated with the proteasome: two proteasome subunits, Rpn10/S5a/PSMD4 and Rpn13/ADRM1 (Adhesion-regulating molecule 1), and three families of shuttling factors, Rad23, Dsk2, and Ddi1. ADRM1 is a ubiquitin receptor of the proteasome (1,2) that binds ubiquitin via a pleckstrin homology domain known as the pleckstrin-like receptor for ubiquitin (Pru) domain. The carboxy-terminal domain of mammalian ADRM1 serves to bind and enhance the isopeptidase activity of UCHL5/UCH37 (3-5), perhaps serving as a mechanism to accelerate ubiquitin chain disassembly. A murine Adrm1 knockout results in defective gametogenesis, thus highlighting a physiologic role for endogenous ADRM1 in mammalian development (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: A20, also referred to as TNF-α-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3), is cytokine-inducible protein that functions to inhibit apoptosis and activate NF-κB (1,2). It was first identified as a TNF-α inducible primary response gene in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and encodes a 790-amino acid protein containing seven Cys2/Cys2-zinc finger motifs (3). Constitutive expression of A20 is observed in lymphoid tissues (4), but it is transiently expressed in a variety of cell types in response to inflammatory signals such as TNF-α (3,5), IL-1 (3,5), phorbol esters (6), and LPS (7). Expression of A20 can confer resistance to apoptosis and NF-κB activation triggered by these signals, probably through interference with TRAF (TNF receptor associated factor) family members (8,9), and interaction with the NF-κB inhibiting protein ABIN (10). Studies also show that A20 contains site-specific ubiquitin modifying activity that can contribute to its biological functions (11,12). The amino-terminus of A20 contains de-ubiquitinating (DUB) activity for Lys63 branches, such as those found in TRAF6 and RIP, while the carboxyl-terminus contains ubiquitin ligase (E3) activity for Lys48 branches of the same substrates and leads to their degradation (12).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Neutrophil elastase is hematopoietic serine protease that belongs to the chymotrypsin superfamily and plays a critical role in the innate immune function of mature neutrophils and monocytes (1,2). Neutrophil elastase is actively synthesized as an inactive zymogen in myelocytic precursor cells of the bone marrow, which then undergoes activation by limited proteolysis and sorting to primary (azurophil) storage granules of mature neutrophil granulocytes for regulated release (3,4). Research studies have shown that neutrophils play a significant role in mediating the inflammatory response through the release of neutrophil elastase, which activates pro-inflammatory cytokines and degrades components of the extracellular matrix and Gram-negative bacteria (5). Mutations in the gene encoding neutrophil elastase, ELA2, have been implicated in hematological diseases such as cyclic and severe congenital neutropenia, which is characterized by defects in promyelocyte maturation (6,7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTEN induced putative kinase 1, PINK1, is a mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase involved in the normal function and integrity of mitochondria, as well as in reduction of cytochrome c release from mitochondria (1-3). PINK1 phosphorylates Parkin and promotes its translocation to mitochondria (2). Research studies have shown that mutations in PINK1 are linked to autosomal recessive early onset Parkinson’s disease, and are associated with loss of protective function, mitochondrial dysfunction, aggregation of α-synuclein, as well as proteasome dysfunction (1,3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TMS1 (target of methylation-induced silencing)/ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD), also referred to as PYCARD and CARD5, is a 22-kDa pro-apoptotic protein containing an N-terminal pyrin domain (PYD) and a C-terminal caspase recruitment domain (CARD) (1-2). The ASC/TMS1 gene was originally found to be aberrantly methylated and silenced in breast cancer cells (2), and has since been found to be silenced in a number of other cancers, including ovarian cancer (3), glioblastoma (4), melanoma (5), gastric cancer (6), lung cancer (7), and prostate cancer (8). Expression of ASC/TMS1 can be induced by pro-apoptotic/inflammatory stimuli (9). During apoptosis ASC/TMS1 is re-distributed from the cytosol to the mitochondria and associates with mitochondrial Bax to trigger cytochrome c release and subsequent apoptosis (10). ASC/TMS1 has also been found to be a critical component of inflammatory signaling where it associates with and activates caspase-1 in response to pro-inflammatory signals (11).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Flotillins belong to a family of lipid raft-associated integral membrane proteins that carry an evolutionarily conserved domain called the prohibitin homology domain (PHB) (1). Flotillin members are ubiquitously expressed and located in noncaveolar microdomains (lipid rafts) on the plasma membrane where they support signal transduction and regulate lipid raft motility and localization (2-5). Two flotillin members have been described, flotillin-1 and flotillin-2. In addition to its colocalization with lipid rafts on the plasma membrane, flotillin-1 also has been found in compartments of the endocytic and autophagosomal pathways, such as recycling/late endosomes, the Golgi complex, and the nucleus (6,7). Flotillin-2 is mainly localized to the plasma membrane and is prevalent in cell-cell contact sites. However, overexpressed flotillin-2 has also been found in the late endosome (4,8,9). Both flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 are commonly used as lipid raft-associated markers.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CD28 is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed by T cells as well as some other hematopoietic cells (1, 2). T cell activation requires T cell receptor (TCR) recognition of antigen presented in the context of MHC molecules. CD28 acts as a T cell costimulatory receptor, and interaction of CD28 with its ligands CD80 or CD86 provides the second signal required for naïve T cell activation (3-5). Activation of naïve T cells in the absence of CD28 stimulation can result in a state of T cell anergy, or unresponsiveness (3). CD28 signals through cytoplasmic phospho-tyrosine motifs that bind several SH2 or SH3 domain-containing proteins involved in T cell activation (2). Recently, CD28 was demonstrated to be a preferred target of PD-1-mediated dephosphorylation. Consistently, CD28 expression was required for T cell proliferation following PD-1 blockade and CD28 stimulation was required for effective anti-PD-1 cancer immunotherapy in mice (6, 7). Several CD28 isoforms are produced by alternative splicing (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The pannexin family (pannexin-1, -2, and -3; PANX1-3) of gap junction proteins has homology to the invertebrate innexins and display distinct expression patterns (1). Pannexin-1 is widely expressed, with highest expression in the heart, brain, skeletal muscle, testis, and ovary (1,2). Pannexin-2 is predominately expressed in the brain (1,2) and pannexin-3 is found within the skin and connective tissues (1,3). Connexin family gap junction proteins form hemichannels that align adjacent cells, creating functional intercellular channels that are permeable to ions and small molecules. In contrast, pannexin proteins may not function as gap junction proteins since pannexins on adjacent cells may not align to form complete channels (3). These pannexin “hemichannels” may play a role in inflammation, apoptosis, and neuronal signaling by allowing permeability of ions, ATP, and potentially other small molecules into the extracellular space (4-6). Pannexin-1 can be activated by effector caspases (caspase-3 and -7), which leads to release of signal molecules that promote phagocytosis of apoptotic cells (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Flotillins belong to a family of lipid raft-associated integral membrane proteins that carry an evolutionarily conserved domain called the prohibitin homology domain (PHB) (1). Flotillin members are ubiquitously expressed and located in noncaveolar microdomains (lipid rafts) on the plasma membrane where they support signal transduction and regulate lipid raft motility and localization (2-5). Two flotillin members have been described, flotillin-1 and flotillin-2. In addition to its colocalization with lipid rafts on the plasma membrane, flotillin-1 also has been found in compartments of the endocytic and autophagosomal pathways, such as recycling/late endosomes, the Golgi complex, and the nucleus (6,7). Flotillin-2 is mainly localized to the plasma membrane and is prevalent in cell-cell contact sites. However, overexpressed flotillin-2 has also been found in the late endosome (4,8,9). Both flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 are commonly used as lipid raft-associated markers.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The maintenance of glucose homeostasis is an essential physiological process that is regulated by hormones. An elevation in blood glucose levels during feeding stimulates insulin release from pancreatic β cells through a glucose sensing pathway (1). Insulin is synthesized as a precursor molecule, proinsulin, which is processed prior to secretion. A- and B-peptides are joined together by a disulfide bond to form insulin, while the central portion of the precursor molecule is cleaved and released as the C-peptide. Insulin stimulates glucose uptake from blood into skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Insulin deficiency leads to type 1 diabetes mellitus (2).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNF-α, the prototypical member of the TNF protein superfamily, is a homotrimeric type-II membrane protein (1,2). Membrane-bound TNF-α is cleaved by the metalloprotease TACE/ADAM17 to generate a soluble homotrimer (2). Both membrane and soluble forms of TNF-α are biologically active. TNF-α is produced by a variety of immune cells including T cells, B cells, NK cells, and macrophages (1). Cellular response to TNF-α is mediated through interaction with receptors TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 and results in activation of pathways that favor both cell survival and apoptosis depending on the cell type and biological context. Activation of kinase pathways (including JNK, Erk1/2, p38 MAPK, and NF-κB) promotes the survival of cells, while TNF-α-mediated activation of caspase-8 leads to programmed cell death (1,2). TNF-α plays a key regulatory role in inflammation and host defense against bacterial infection, notably Mycobacterium tuberculosis (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DPP4 (CD26) is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein expressed ubiquitously in most tissues and different cell types (1,2). The protein has a short cytoplasmic domain, transmembrane domain, a flexible stalk fragment and extracellular fragment (2). Both the catalytic peptide hydrolase domain and the beta-propeller ligand binding domain are located in the extracellular fragment (2). DPP4 is a multifunctional protein that exists in both a membrane bound form as well as an extracellular soluble form. As a peptidase, it removes N-terminal dipeptides sequentially from proteins with a proline or alanine as the penultimate P1 amino acid (3.4). DPP4 has been shown to cleave a wide range of substrates including GLP-1, BNP, substance P, etc. It is also involved in the regulation of related biological functions (5). In addition to it peptidase activity, DPP4 interacts with multiple important cell surface ligands, such as adenosine deaminase, fibronectin, and IGF2 receptor to influence processes like T cell activation, cell migration and proliferation (5). Several DPP4 inhibitors have been developed and their effects have been tested in the field of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and tumor immunity (2,5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNF-α, the prototypical member of the TNF protein superfamily, is a homotrimeric type-II membrane protein (1,2). Membrane-bound TNF-α is cleaved by the metalloprotease TACE/ADAM17 to generate a soluble homotrimer (2). Both membrane and soluble forms of TNF-α are biologically active. TNF-α is produced by a variety of immune cells including T cells, B cells, NK cells, and macrophages (1). Cellular response to TNF-α is mediated through interaction with receptors TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 and results in activation of pathways that favor both cell survival and apoptosis depending on the cell type and biological context. Activation of kinase pathways (including JNK, Erk1/2, p38 MAPK, and NF-κB) promotes the survival of cells, while TNF-α-mediated activation of caspase-8 leads to programmed cell death (1,2). TNF-α plays a key regulatory role in inflammation and host defense against bacterial infection, notably Mycobacterium tuberculosis (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The tumor necrosis factor receptor family, which includes TNF-RI, Fas, DR3, DR4, DR5, and DR6, plays an important role in the regulation of apoptosis in various physiological systems (1,2). The receptors are activated by a family of cytokines that include TNF, FasL, and TRAIL. They are characterized by a highly conserved extracellular region containing cysteine-rich repeats and a conserved intracellular region of about 80 amino acids termed the death domain (DD). The DD is important for transducing the death signal by recruiting other DD containing adaptor proteins (FADD, TRADD, RIP) to the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), resulting in activation of caspases.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cellular FLIP (FLICE inhibitory protein) is a regulator of apoptosis that has various names, such as c-FLIP (1), Casper (2), CLARP (3), FLAME (4), I-FLICE (5), MRIT (6), CASH (7), and Usurpin (8). FLIP is expressed as two alternative splice isoforms, FLIP short (FLIPS) and FLIP long (FLIPL). FLIPS contains two death effector domains (DEDs) like those found on the death receptor adaptor protein FADD and the pro-domain of caspase-8. FLIPL shares significant homology with caspase-8 (FLICE), and contains an additional death effector domain, but FLIPL lacks the catalytic active site of the caspases and does not have protease activity. Both FLIP isoforms have been reported to interact with FADD and pro-caspase-8. The role of FLIP in apoptosis is controversial as some research studies have reported it to be anti-apoptotic, while others claim that it is pro-apoptotic. Overexpression of FLIPL can lead to caspase-8 heterodimers that produce an active protease, resulting in apoptosis. However, at physiological levels, it is thought that the binding of FLIP to the DED of FADD results in inhibition of caspase-8 processing. Reduction of FLIP by siRNA or gene targeting sensitizes cells to death receptor-mediated apoptosis. FLIP has also been implicated in the resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis and is upregulated in some cancer types including Hodgkin's lymphoma and ovarian and colon carcinomas (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ca2+ is a key second messenger in many intracellular signaling pathways. Ca2+ signals control many cellular functions ranging from short-term responses such as contraction and secretion to longer-term regulation of cell growth and proliferation (1,2). Stromal interaction molecules (STIMs) function as Ca2+ sensors that detect changes in Ca2+ content in intracellular Ca2+ stores (3). STIM1 is conserved, ubiquitously expressed, and functions as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ sensor that migrates from the ER Ca2+ store to the plasma membrane where it activates calcium-release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels when the ER Ca2+ store is low (4). STIM1 is a potential tumor suppressor; defects in STIM1 may cause rhabdomyosarcoma and rhabdoid tumors (5). STIM1 can either homodimerize or form heterodimers with STIM2. STIM2 possesses a high sequence identity to STIM1 and can function as an inhibitor of STIM1-mediated plasma membrane store-operated Ca2+ entry (6). However, further investigation is required to elucidate the true physiological function of STIM2.