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Monoclonal Antibody Immunoprecipitation Regulation of Cell Division

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB1) belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved, multifunctional Y-box proteins that bind single-stranded DNA and RNA and function as regulators of transcription, RNA metabolism, and protein synthesis (1). YB1 binds to Y-box sequences (TAACC) found in multiple gene promoters and can positively or negatively regulate transcription. YB1 activates genes associated with proliferation and cancer, such as cyclin A, cyclin B1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and the multi-drug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene (2-4). YB1 represses genes associated with cell death, including the Fas cell death-associated receptor and the p53 tumor suppressor gene (5-7). It also interacts with the RNA-splicing factor SRp30c and stabilizes interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA upon induction of T lymphocytes by IL-2 (8,9). The majority of YB1 protein localizes to the cytoplasm, with a minor pool found in the nucleus; however, nuclear localization appears to be critical for its role in promoting proliferation. Nuclear translocation is cell cycle regulated, with YB1 protein accumulating in the nucleus during G1/S phase (2). In addition, nuclear translocation is induced in response to extracellular stimuli such as hyperthermia and UV irradiation, or treatment of cells with thrombin, interferons, or insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) (2,10). Treatment of the MCF7 breast cancer cell line with IGF-I results in Akt-mediated phosphorylation of YB1 at Ser102, which is required for nuclear translocation of YB1 and its ability to promote anchorage-independent growth (10). Research studies have shown that YB1 is overexpressed in many malignant tissues, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung carcinoma, ovarian adenocarcinomas, human osteosarcomas, colorectal carcinomas, and malignant melanomas. Investigators have shown that nuclear YB1 expression correlates with high levels of proliferation, drug resistance, and poor tumor prognosis (2,7,10).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Catalase catalyzes the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen (1). Research studies show that overexpression of this antioxidant enzyme increases the ability of pancreatic β-cells to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby protecting pancreatic β-cells from oxidative stress (2). The pancreatic β-cells overexpressing this enzyme are also protected from hydrogen peroxide-mediated lipotoxicity, providing further evidence for the importance of catalase in the pathogenesis of diabetes (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The ubiquitously expressed thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) binds and inhibits thioredoxin to regulate cellular redox state (1-3). Research studies demonstrate that hyperglycemia induces TXNIP expression and increases cellular oxidative stress (1). In addition, these studies show that TXNIP reduces glucose uptake directly by binding the glucose transporter Glut1 to stimulate receptor internalization or indirectly by reducing Glut1 mRNA levels (3). Additional studies indicate that TXNIP plays a role in the regulation of insulin mRNA transcription (4). Microarray analyses indicate that TXNIP acts downstream of PPARγ and is a putative tumor suppressor that may control thyroid cancer cell progression (5). In addition, the TXNIP protein may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and some disorders related to ER-stress (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: At least 4 distinct polo-like kinases exist in mammalian cells: PLK1, PLK2, PLK3 and PLK4/SAK (1). Like the other PLK family members, PLK3 contains an amino-terminal catalytic domain and a conserved carboxy-terminal domain termed the Polo box (2). PLK3, also called proliferation-related kinase (Prk) (3), was originally described as a fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-inducible kinase (Fnk) and identified as an immediate-early response gene responsive to FGF-1 and other mitogens (4). PLK3 is a cytokine-inducible serine/threonine kinase whose protein expression is cell cycle regulated. Though its expression is found primarily in G1 phase of the cell cycle, PLK3 is detected in G0 and in late telophase prior to cytokinesis (5). Like the other PLK family members, PLK3 functions mainly as a regulator of the cell cycle. Specifically, PLK3 is required for entry into S phase and is a critical regulator of G1 events, as indicated by RNAi-induced PLK3-depleted cells (2). PLK3 is also involved in the regulation of DNA damage response via phosphorylation of p53 on Ser20 (6). PLK3 may act as a tumor suppressor as Plk3-deficient mice develop spontaneous tumors in various organs (7). Unlike PLK1, PLK3 expression is down regulated in cancers including lung (3), head and neck (8), and colon (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) produce mitogenic and angiogenic effects in target cells by signaling through cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases. There are four members of the FGF receptor family: FGFR1 (flg), FGFR2 (bek, KGFR), FGFR3, and FGFR4. Each receptor contains an extracellular ligand binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic kinase domain (1). Following ligand binding and dimerization, the receptors are phosphorylated at specific tyrosine residues (2). Seven tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of FGFR1 can be phosphorylated: Tyr463, 583, 585, 653, 654, 730, and 766. Tyr653 and Tyr654 are important for catalytic activity of activated FGFR and are essential for signaling (3). The other phosphorylated tyrosine residues may provide docking sites for downstream signaling components such as Crk and PLCγ (4,5).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) produce mitogenic and angiogenic effects in target cells by signaling through cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases. There are four members of the FGF receptor family: FGFR1 (flg), FGFR2 (bek, KGFR), FGFR3, and FGFR4. Each receptor contains an extracellular ligand binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic kinase domain (1). Following ligand binding and dimerization, the receptors are phosphorylated at specific tyrosine residues (2). Seven tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of FGFR1 can be phosphorylated: Tyr463, 583, 585, 653, 654, 730, and 766. Tyr653 and Tyr654 are important for catalytic activity of activated FGFR and are essential for signaling (3). The other phosphorylated tyrosine residues may provide docking sites for downstream signaling components such as Crk and PLCγ (4,5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Patched1 and 2 (PTCH1 and PTCH2) are twelve-pass transmembrane proteins that function as the receiving receptors for members of the Hedgehog family of proteins (1-4). In the absence of Hedgehog proteins, PTCH suppresses the otherwise constitutively active signaling receptor Smoothened (Smo) so that the Hedgehog signaling pathway is in the off state (5,6). Deactivating mutations that impair the ability of PTCH1 to suppress Smo are frequently found in patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (7,8). PTCH proteins have a sterol-sensing domain (SSD) also found in several proteins that function in cholesterol homeostasis, such as HMGCR (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A-reductase) and SCAP (sterol regulatory element-binding protein-cleavage activating protein). However, the role of the SSD in Patched proteins is not clear (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fibroblast growth factors are a family of broad-spectrum growth factors influencing a plethora of cellular activities. The interaction of at least 23 ligands, 4 receptors and multiple coreceptors provides a dramatic complexity to a signaling system capable of effecting a multitude of responses (1,2). Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or FGF2), initially identified as a mitogen with prominent angiogenic properties, is now recognized as a multifunctional growth factor (3). It is clear that bFGF produces its biological effects in target cells by signaling through cell-surface FGF receptors. bFGF binds to all four FGF receptors. Ligand binding induces receptor dimerization and autophosphorylation, allowing binding and activation of cytoplasmic downstream target proteins, including FRS-2, PLC and Crk (4,5). The FGF signaling pathway appears to play a significant role not only in normal cell growth regulation but also in tumor development and progression (6).Acidic FGF (aFGF or FGF1) is another extensively investigated protein of the FGF family. aFGF shares 55% DNA sequence homology with bFGF. These two growth factors are ubiquitously expressed and exhibit a wide spectrum of similiar biological activities with quantitative differences likely due to variation in receptor affinity or binding (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The highly conserved receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1), homologous to the β subunit of heterotrimeric G-proteins, was originally identified through its binding of active PKCβII and other classical PKC isoforms (1). RACK1 is a scaffold protein that recruits PKC and a wide range of other proteins to specific subcellular locations, promoting the formation of multiprotein complexes to induce and integrate various signaling pathways (reviewed in 2). One example of this is its enhancement of PKC-dependent JNK activation (3). RACK1 protein also resides in the eukaryotic ribosome, suggesting the possibility that RACK1 participates in the assembly of signaling complexes that regulate translation as well (reviewed in 4). RACK1 binds the SH2 domain of Src, and phosphorylation of RACK1 by Src occurs at Tyr228 after PKC activation (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1a) belongs to the IL-1 family of cytokines with 11 members including IL-1b. IL-1a is expressed in many cell types of both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origins under steady state, and its expression can be increased in response to appropriate stimuli (1,2). Like IL-1b, IL-1a is also synthesized as a precursor (pro-IL-1a) and can be cleaved into smaller mature forms. However, both pro-IL-1a and the cleaved form of IL-1a are biologically active and can activate the signaling pathway through the membrane receptor IL-1R1. IL-1a is active both as a secreted form and as a membrane-bound form. Due to such characteristics, passive leakage of IL-1a from dying cells can activate inflammation, leading some researchers to consider IL-1a as a key “alarmin in the cell” that alerts the host to damage or injury (3,4). In addition, IL-1a can also enter the nucleus to modulate transcription (5,6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), one of the major caspase-1 targets, is a multifunctional cytokine that is involved in a host of immune and proinflammatory responses (1). It is produced primarily by activated monocytes and macrophages. It signals through various adaptor proteins and kinases that lead to activation of numerous downstream targets (2-6). Human IL-1β is synthesized as a 31 kDa precursor. To gain activity, the precursor must be cleaved by caspase-1 between Asp116 and Ala117 to yield a 17 kDa mature form (7,8). Detection of the 17 kDa mature form of IL-1β is a good indicator of caspase-1 activity.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Eukaryotic cell proliferation depends strictly upon the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), whose main function is to trigger the transition of the cell cycle from metaphase to anaphase. The APC/C complex promotes the assembly of polyubiquitin chains on substrate proteins in order to target these proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome (1,2). The vertebrate APC/C complex consists of as many as 15 subunits, including multiple scaffold proteins, two catalytic subunits (APC2, APC11), and a number of proteins responsible for substrate recognition (3). All E3 enzymes, including APC/C, utilize ubiquitin residues activated by E1 enzymes and transferred to E2 enzymes. Research studies indicate that APC/C interacts with the E2 enzymes UBE2S and UBE2C via the RING-finger domain-containing subunit APC11 (4-6). APC/C function relies on multiple cofactors, including an APC/C coactivator formed by the cell division control protein 20 homolog (CDC20) and Cdh1/FZR1. The CDC20/Cdh1 coactivator is responsible for recognition of APC/C substrates through interaction with specific D-box and KEN-box recognition elements within these substrates (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Eg5 (also called kinesin-like protein 11 or Kif11) belongs to the kinesin-like family of motor proteins important in chromosome positioning, centrosome separation, and mitotic spindle formation. Phosphorylation of Eg5 by mitotic kinases regulates its activity by modulating its association with microtubules (1,2). Because anti-mitotic chemotherapeutic drugs, such as taxanes, target microtubules and have pleiotropic and sometimes toxic effects, drugs that target microtubule-associated proteins such as Eg5 are currently in development (3-5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ribosomal protein S3 (rpS3) is a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit and is involved in translation. HSP90 interacts with both the amino-terminus and carboxy-terminus of rpS3, preventing its ubiquitination and degradation and thereby retaining the integrity of the ribosome (1). rpS3 has also been shown to function as an endonuclease during DNA damage repair (2,3). Furthermore, overexpression of rpS3 sensitizes lymphocytic cells to cytokine-induced apoptosis, indicating a third role for rpS3 during apoptosis (4). The functions of rpS3 during DNA damage repair and apoptosis have been mapped to two distinct domains (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The cell division cycle demands accuracy to avoid the accumulation of genetic damage. This process is controlled by molecular circuits called "checkpoints" that are common to all eukaryotic cells (1). Checkpoints monitor DNA integrity and cell growth prior to replication and division at the G1/S and G2/M transitions, respectively. The cdc2-cyclin B kinase is pivotal in regulating the G2/M transition (2,3). Cdc2 is phosphorylated at Thr14 and Tyr15 during G2-phase by the kinases Wee1 and Myt1, rendering it inactive. The tumor suppressor protein retinoblastoma (Rb) controls progression through the late G1 restriction point (R) and is a major regulator of the G1/S transition (4). During early and mid G1-phase, Rb binds to and represses the transcription factor E2F (5). The phosphorylation of Rb late in G1-phase by CDKs induces Rb to dissociate from E2F, permitting the transcription of S-phase-promoting genes. In vitro, Rb can be phosphorylated at multiple sites by cdc2, cdk2, and cdk4/6 (6-8). DNA damage triggers both the G2/M and the G1/S checkpoints. DNA damage activates the DNA-PK/ATM/ATR kinases, which phosphorylate Chk at Ser345 (9), Chk2 at Thr68 (10) and p53 (11). The Chk kinases inactivate cdc25 via phosphorylation at Ser216, blocking the activation of cdc2.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Eukaryotic cell proliferation depends strictly upon the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), whose main function is to trigger the transition of the cell cycle from metaphase to anaphase. The APC/C complex promotes the assembly of polyubiquitin chains on substrate proteins in order to target these proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome (1,2). The vertebrate APC/C complex consists of as many as 15 subunits, including multiple scaffold proteins, two catalytic subunits (APC2, APC11), and a number of proteins responsible for substrate recognition (3). All E3 enzymes, including APC/C, utilize ubiquitin residues activated by E1 enzymes and transferred to E2 enzymes. Research studies indicate that APC/C interacts with the E2 enzymes UBE2S and UBE2C via the RING-finger domain-containing subunit APC11 (4-6). APC/C function relies on multiple cofactors, including an APC/C coactivator formed by the cell division control protein 20 homolog (CDC20) and Cdh1/FZR1. The CDC20/Cdh1 coactivator is responsible for recognition of APC/C substrates through interaction with specific D-box and KEN-box recognition elements within these substrates (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: EB1 (end-binding protein 1) is a microtubule associated protein (1). EB1 localizes to the growing ends of microtubules, the centrosome and the mitotic spindle (2-4). EB1 is also found to associate with the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein (5). Recent studies also suggest that EB1 plays a role in microtubule-based transport (6).

$122
20 µl
$307
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cdc25 is a protein phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylating and activating cdc2, a crucial step in regulating the entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis (1). cdc25C is constitutively phosphorylated at Ser216 throughout interphase by c-TAK1, while phosphorylation at this site is DNA damage-dependent at the G2/M checkpoint (2). When phosphorylated at Ser216, cdc25C binds to members of the 14-3-3 family of proteins, sequestering cdc25C in the cytoplasm and thereby preventing premature mitosis (3). The checkpoint kinases Chk1 and Chk2 phosphorylate cdc25C at Ser216 in response to DNA damage (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TIAR is a member of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM) family of RNA-binding proteins (1,2). It functions as a translational repressor under conditions of cellular damage (3,4). In response to cellular stress, TIAR associates with eIF1, eIF3, and the 40S ribosomal subunit and forms noncanonical preinitiation complexes that are translationally inactive (3,4). TIAR then aggregates with its family member TIA1 and facilitates the accumulation of the translationally inactive preinitiation complexes into discrete cytoplasmic foci called stress granules. The two major isoforms of TIAR are the products of alternative mRNA splicing (5,6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cdc25 is a protein phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylating and activating cdc2, a crucial step in regulating the entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis (1). cdc25C is constitutively phosphorylated at Ser216 throughout interphase by c-TAK1, while phosphorylation at this site is DNA damage-dependent at the G2/M checkpoint (2). When phosphorylated at Ser216, cdc25C binds to members of the 14-3-3 family of proteins, sequestering cdc25C in the cytoplasm and thereby preventing premature mitosis (3). The checkpoint kinases Chk1 and Chk2 phosphorylate cdc25C at Ser216 in response to DNA damage (4,5).