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Monoclonal Antibody Immunoprecipitation Regulation of Dna Recombination

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between non-identical DNA sequences and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2).Mutations in MSH2 have been found in a large proportion of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations have also been associated with other sporadic tumors.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between non-identical DNA sequences and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2).Mutations in MSH2 have been found in a large proportion of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations have also been associated with other sporadic tumors.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DNA damage, if not repaired, can lead to genome instability and tumorigenesis. Eukaryotic cells use multiple (sometimes overlapping) signaling pathways to respond to agents that cause various types of DNA lesions. Downstream molecules in DNA repair pathways converge on the sites of DNA damage, resulting in cell cycle arrest and repair or apoptosis (1). Rad18 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase recruited to sites of DNA damage. Along with the E2 ubiquitin ligase Rad6, Rad18 is responsible for monoubiquitination of DNA damage proteins including the replication clamp PCNA and the Fanconi anemia core protein FANCD2. Monoubiquitination of these proteins signals to downstream effector molecules and results in the repair of either post-replication repair lesions via the translesion synthesis (TLS) pathway or DNA double strand breaks via homologous recombination (2-4). Phospho-proteomic studies indicate that Ser403 of Rad18 may be phosphorylated by ATM/ATR in response to DNA damage-inducing agents (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: mRNA export is a process that is tightly coupled to mRNA splicing (1-4). Splicing and packaging of mRNAs in the form of an mRNA-protein complex (mRNP) leads to the recruitment of the mRNA export adaptor THOC4/ALY, via its interaction with the splicing factor UAP56, forming a large complex termed the transcription-export complex (TREX) (1,2,5). THOC4/ALY then directly interacts with NXF1/TAP, a part of the heterodimer that targets the mRNP to the nuclear pore complex, resulting in the shuttling of mRNP out of the nucleus and into the cytoplasm (1-3,6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DNA damage, if not repaired, can lead to genome instability and tumorigenesis. Eukaryotic cells use multiple (sometimes overlapping) signaling pathways to respond to agents that cause various types of DNA lesions. Downstream molecules in DNA repair pathways converge on the sites of DNA damage, resulting in cell cycle arrest and repair or apoptosis (1). Rad18 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase recruited to sites of DNA damage. Along with the E2 ubiquitin ligase Rad6, Rad18 is responsible for monoubiquitination of DNA damage proteins including the replication clamp PCNA and the Fanconi anemia core protein FANCD2. Monoubiquitination of these proteins signals to downstream effector molecules and results in the repair of either post-replication repair lesions via the translesion synthesis (TLS) pathway or DNA double strand breaks via homologous recombination (2-4). Phospho-proteomic studies indicate that Ser403 of Rad18 may be phosphorylated by ATM/ATR in response to DNA damage-inducing agents (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Telomeric repeat-binding factor 2-interacting protein (TERF2IP, also known as RAP1) is a component of the Shelterin Complex, a multi-protein complex that binds and organizes telomeres into T-loop structures to prevent them from being recognized by the cell as DNA double stranded breaks (1,2). The Shelterin Complex is composed of TERF2IP, TIN2 and TPP2 proteins, in addition to three DNA binding proteins that function to recruit the complex to telomeres: TRF1 and TRF2 bind double-stranded TTAGGG repeats found at telomeres, while the POT1 protein binds single-stranded TTAGGG repeats found at the very end of the telomeres (2). Together, these proteins function to protect telomeres and ensure proper replication and processing of chromosome ends. Recent studies have shown that TERF2IP is dispensable for maintenance of telomere length, organization of telomeric chromatin, and regulation of telomeric transcription (3,4). However, TERF2IP is required for inhibition of homology-directed repair (HDR), which can create undesirable telomeric sister chromatid exchange (3,4). In addition to its role in telomere maintenance, TERF2IP is also found in the cytoplasm, where it functions as an IκB kinase (IKK) adaptor protein and regulates NF-κB-dependent gene expression (5). TERF2IP forms a complex with IKKs and is critical for proper recruitment of IKKs to and activation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB. Elevated levels of TERF2IP have been found in breast cancer cells with NF-κB hyperactivity, and knockdown of TERF2IP sensitizes these cells to apoptosis, further identifying TERF2IP as a potential cancer therapeutic target (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are potentially hazardous lesions that can be induced by ionizing radiation (IR), radiomimetic chemicals, or DNA replication inhibitors. Cells sense and repair DSBs via two distinct but partly overlapping signaling pathways, nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Research studies have shown that defects in both pathways are associated with human disease, including cancer (reviewed in 1).DSBs that arise during S or G2 phase are repaired via homologous recombination (HR), using the replicated sister chromatid as a repair template. Rad51 recombinase, a eukaryotic homologue of E. coli RecA, polymerizes and forms a filament along single-stranded DNA, mediating HR with the help of auxiliary proteins, including Rad54 and BRCA2 (reviewed in 2,3). BRCA2 binds Rad51 and targets it to single-stranded DNA, allowing it to displace replication protein A (RPA) (4). Five Rad51 paralogs exist in vertebrates (XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B, Rad51C, and Rad51D) and they all appear to be required for efficient HR (5).Researchers have found that mutations in the Rad51 gene may be related to breast cancer risk (6). Some studies have implicated Rad51 as a potential marker for pancreatic cancer (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The sequences encoding antigen receptors are split into multiple germline segments which are then combined by a process called V(D)J recombination during immune cells development. A variable (V) segment is combined with a joining (J) segment, and in some cases a D (Diversity) segment, to create the antigen-binding portion of the receptor. The recombined V(D)J segment is then spliced into exons that encode the constant region to produce mature mRNA (1,2). This essential process required for the development of functional immune T and B cells creates a vast diversity in these receptors (3,4). Initiation of this process follows binding of RAG1 (recombination activating gene 1) and RAG2 to the conserved recombination signal sequences (RSS) and the introduction of a double-strand break between the RSS and the coding sequence (5,6). RAG1 and RAG2 genes are located immediately adjacent to each other in the genome and lack introns in their coding regions in many species. RAG1 and RAG2 are coexpressed only in the B and T cell lineages and both are required for cleavage activity (7). RAG1 and RAG2 can also function as transposases, contributing to chromosomal translocations and lymphoid malignancy (8,9). Mutations in the RAG genes are associated with a spectrum of combined immune deficiencies in humans (10,11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mre11, originally described in genetic screens from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which mutants were defective in meiotic recombination (1), is a central part of a multisubunit nuclease composed of Mre11, Rad50 and Nbs1 (MRN) (2,3). The MRN complex plays a critical role in sensing, processing and repairing DNA double strand breaks. Defects lead to genomic instability, telomere shortening, aberrant meiosis and hypersensitivity to DNA damage (4). Hypomorphic mutations of Mre11 are found in ataxia-telangiectasia-like disease (ATLD), with phenotypes similar to mutations in ATM that cause ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), including a predisposition to malignancy in humans (5). Cellular consequences of ATLD include chromosomal instability and defects in the intra-S phase and G2/M checkpoints in response to DNA damage. The MRN complex may directly activate the ATM checkpoint kinase at DNA breaks (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mismatch repair (MMR), a conserved process that involves correcting errors made during DNA synthesis, is crucial to the maintenance of genomic integrity. MLH1 is the human homologue of the E. coli MMR gene mutL. MMR requires recognition of a base mismatch or insertion/deletion loop by a MutS homolog followed by recruitment of a MutL heterodimeric complex consisting of MLH1 and PMS1 (MutL-γ), PMS2 (MutL-α) or MLH3 (MutL-γ). Other factors required for MMR in eukaryotes are EXO1, PCNA, RFC, RPA, DNA polymerases and DNA ligase (reviewed in 1). Inactivation of the MLH1 gene causes genome instability and predisposition to cancer (2-5). The MLH1 gene is frequently mutated in hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC) (6). MLH1 also plays a role in meiotic recombination (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mismatch repair (MMR), a conserved process that involves correcting errors made during DNA synthesis, is crucial to the maintenance of genomic integrity. MLH1 is the human homologue of the E. coli MMR gene mutL. MMR requires recognition of a base mismatch or insertion/deletion loop by a MutS homolog followed by recruitment of a MutL heterodimeric complex consisting of MLH1 and PMS1 (MutL-γ), PMS2 (MutL-α) or MLH3 (MutL-γ). Other factors required for MMR in eukaryotes are EXO1, PCNA, RFC, RPA, DNA polymerases and DNA ligase (reviewed in 1). Inactivation of the MLH1 gene causes genome instability and predisposition to cancer (2-5). The MLH1 gene is frequently mutated in hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC) (6). MLH1 also plays a role in meiotic recombination (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The cohesin complex consists of a heterodimer between SMC1 (SMC1A or B) and SMC3, bound by additional RAD21 and STAG proteins (STAG1, 2, or 3) (1,2). These proteins form a ring-like structure that mediates the cohesion of two sister chromatids after DNA replication in S phase (1,2). RAD21 and STAG2 are phosphorylated by Polo-like kinase (PLK) during prophase, which leads to the dissociation of cohesin complexes from the chromosome arms; however, cohesin remains bound to centromeres until anaphase (3,4). RAD21 is cleaved by separin/ESPL1 in anaphase, which leads to dissociation of the remaining cohesin from centromeres, enabling sister chromatids to segregate during mitosis (5). RAD21 is also cleaved by caspase-3 and caspase-7 during apoptosis, resulting in a 64 kDa carboxy-terminal cleavage product that translocates to the cytoplasm and may help to trigger apoptosis (6,7). In addition to mediating cohesion of sister chromatids, the cohesin complex plays important roles in gene regulation and DNA repair, as SMC1 and SMC3 are both phosphorylated by ATM and ATR kinases upon DNA damage (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DNA damage resulting from genotoxic stress activates cellular checkpoints that prevent or delay cell division until damaged DNA is repaired or the cell follows an apoptotic pathway. The Rad9 homolog A (Rad9A, Rad9) protein is part of a checkpoint protein complex that acts as an early sensor of DNA damage. Together with the HUS1 and Rad1 checkpoint proteins, Rad9 forms a heterotrimeric 9-1-1 complex with a ring structure similar to the processivity factor PCNA. The 9-1-1 complex induces multiple signaling pathways, including the ATM- and ATR-activated DNA repair pathways (1,2). A functional 9-1-1 complex is required for ATR-dependent S phase checkpoint signaling (3).The 9-1-1 complex interacts with DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) in response to DNA damage, activating ATR and causing signal amplification through further recruitment of TopBP1 (4). The 9-1-1 complex interacts with DNA mismatch repair proteins MSH2, MSH3, and MSH6 to play a role in mismatch repair (5). During an error-free DNA damage tolerance process, the 9-1-1 complex cooperates with polyubiquitinated PCNA and Exo1 nuclease to support switching of the replicative polymerase to the undamaged template (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TREX1 is a broadly expressed 3’ to 5’ exonuclease that acts on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to negatively regulate the interferon-stimulatory DNA (ISD) response (1-4). In humans, there are three TREX1 isoforms generated through alternative splicing with predicted molecular weights of 32, 33, and 39 kDa (2). The transcript for the 33 kDa isoform is the most abundant (2). Mice deficient in TREX1 accumulate intracellular ssDNA, which triggers the ISD response and eventually lethal autoimmunity (3,4). Mutations in TREX1 are associated with autoimmune diseases including Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus (5,6). In addition, TREX1 prevents the cell-intrinsic innate immune response to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by digesting excess HIV DNA that would normally trigger induction of type I interferon (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a member of the DNA sliding clamp family of proteins that assist in DNA replication (1). Crystal structure data suggests that a PCNA homotrimer ring can encircle and slide along the DNA double helix (2). Multiple proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell cycle control bind to PCNA rather than directly associating with DNA, thus facilitating fast processing of DNA (reviewed in 3). PCNA protein expression is a well-accepted marker of proliferation.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein ubiquitination is an important posttranslational modification that regulates protein function and fate (1). Ubiquitin (Ub) can be conjugated to target proteins in either monomeric or polymeric forms. There are several different lysine residues within Ub that can be used as conjugation sites for poly-Ub chain formation. Different poly-Ub linkages mediate different functions of the target protein ranging from alterations in protein function to degradation (2). UBE2N/Ubc13 is a ubiquitin-E2-conjugating enzyme that catalyzes K63-linked poly-Ub chain formation (1,2). UBE2N forms a heterodimer with MMS2 or Uev1A to exert its E2 ligase function. The UBE2N/MMS2 and UBE2N/Uev1A heterodimers catalyze different modes of target protein ubiquitination to mediate various signaling pathways (3-5) including: DNA damage and recombination, p53 and check point control, the cell cycle (6-10), immunoreceptor signaling (11,12), and endocytosis (13). Most recently, UBE2N was shown to play an important role in inflammatory signaling by promoting K63-linked ubiquitination and activation of IKK downstream of the IL-1β receptor (14). Furthermore, interaction of UBE2N with the Triad1 E3 protein-ubiquitin ligase was shown to play an important role in myelopoiesis (15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM) and ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related kinase (ATR) are PI3 kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family members that phosphorylate multiple substrates on serine or threonine residues that are followed by a glutamine in response to DNA damage or replication blocks (1-3). Despite the essential role of ATR in cell cycle signaling and DNA repair processes, little is known about its activation. ATR was long thought to exist in a constitutively active state in cells, with DNA damage-induced signaling occurring via recruitment of ATR to single stranded DNA and sites of replication stress. Phosphorylation of ATR at serine 428 in response to UV-induced DNA damage has been suggested as a means of activating ATR (4,5). Recent work has shown autophosphorylation of ATR at threonine 1989. Like ATM Ser1981, phosphorylation of ATR Thr1989 occurs in response to DNA damage, indicating that phosphorylation at this site is important in ATR-mediated signaling (6,7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ku is a heterodimeric protein composed of two subunits (Ku70 and Ku80) originally identified by researchers as autoantigens associated with several autoimmune diseases including scleroderma, polymyositis, and systemic lupus erythematosus (1). Ku is an abundant, ubiquitously expressed nuclear protein that binds to and stabilizes the ends of DNA at telomeres or double-stranded DNA breaks (2-5). The Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer has ATP-dependent DNA helicase activity and functions as the DNA-binding regulatory component of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (6-8). The assembly of the DNA-PK complex at DNA ends is required for nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), one mechanism involved in double-stranded DNA break repair and V(D)J recombination (8). DNA-PK has been shown to phosphorylate many proteins, including p53, serum response factor, c-Jun, c-Fos, c-Myc, Oct-1, Sp-1, and RNA polymerase II (1,8). The combined activities of Ku70/Ku80 and DNA-PK implicate Ku in many cellular functions, including cell cycle regulation, DNA replication and repair, telomere maintenance, recombination, and transcriptional activation.

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a member of the DNA sliding clamp family of proteins that assist in DNA replication (1). Crystal structure data suggests that a PCNA homotrimer ring can encircle and slide along the DNA double helix (2). Multiple proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell cycle control bind to PCNA rather than directly associating with DNA, thus facilitating fast processing of DNA (reviewed in 3). PCNA protein expression is a well-accepted marker of proliferation.