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Monoclonal Antibody Western Blotting Dna Binding

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CDX2, a homeobox domain-containing transcription factor, is a master regulator of the trophoectoderm, the layer that gives rise to extra-embryonic tissues in mammalian development (1). CDX2 is also involved in intestinal development (2), and gain of expression or loss of expression has been associated with various human malignancies such as Barret Esophagus (3) and colorectal cancer (4,5). Mouse embryonic stem cells deficient in CDX2 display limited hematopoietic progenitor development and altered Hox gene expression (6), pointing to a role for CDX2 in Hox gene regulation. CDX2 is also implicated in the aberrant expression of Hox genes in human AML cell lines (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HOXB13 is a member of the HOXB cluster which, along with the HOXA, HOXC, and HOXD clusters, governs embryonic patterning along the cranio-caudal axis (1,2). HOXB13 plays a key role in the development of the ventral prostate, where it is expressed highly from the embryonic stage through adulthood (3,4). Research studies have shown that both overexpression and RNA interference can inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells. HOXB13 can function as a tumor suppressor by negatively regulating growth through repression of TCF4 and androgen receptor (AR) signaling (4,5). However, HOXB13 has also been shown to be overexpressed in more invasive prostate cancers, breast and ovarian cancers, and hepatocellular carcinomas (6-9). A common germline mutation G84E in the HOXB13 protein has recently been found to be associated with significant increased risk of prostate cancer (10). Currently, HOXB13 is being evaluated as a marker for metastatic lesions of prostate origin (11,12).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The RecQ family is a group of DNA helicases that play an important role in global genomic stability (1). Mutations in three of the five known human RecQ proteins (BLM, WRN and RECQL4) give rise to clinically distinct disorders that are characterized by features such as premature aging and predisposition to cancer (2,3). The clinical distinction of each disease associated with these mutations points to distinct roles that members of this helicase family play in DNA metabolism. RecQL1 is the most abundant protein of the RecQ family and was the first family member to be discovered. No disease associations have been reported with RecQL1 and its biological activities are not well understood (4). It has recently been shown that depletion of RecQL1 negatively affects genomic maintenance and cellular proliferation – which may point to a role in DNA damage repair and cell cycle progression (5,6). Upregulation of RecQL1 along with other RecQ family members has been reported in cells in response to oncogenic viral infection (7).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF, PDCD8) is a ubiquitously expressed flavoprotein that plays a critical role in caspase-independent apoptosis (reviewed in 1,2). AIF is normally localized to the mitochondrial intermembrane space and released in response to apoptotic stimuli (3). Treatment of isolated nuclei with recombinant AIF leads to early apoptotic events, such as chromatin condensation and large-scale DNA fragmentation (3). Studies of AIF knockout mice have shown that the apoptotic activity of AIF is cell type and stimuli-dependent. Also noted was that AIF was required for embryoid body cavitation, representing the first wave of programmed cell death during embryonic morphogenesis (4). Structural analysis of AIF revealed two important regions, the first having oxidoreductase activity and the second being a potential DNA binding domain (3,5). While AIF is redox-active and can behave as an NADH oxidase, this activity is not required for inducing apoptosis (6). Instead, recent studies suggest that AIF has dual functions, a pro-apoptotic activity in the nucleus via its DNA binding and an anti-apoptotic activity via the scavenging of free radicals through its oxidoreductase activity (2,7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The methylation state of lysine residues in histone proteins is a major determinant for formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for proper programming of the genome during development (1,2). Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins represent the largest class of potential histone demethylase proteins (3). The JmjC domain can catalyze the demethylation of mono-, di-, and tri-methyl lysine residues via an oxidative reaction that requires iron and α-ketoglutarate (3). Based on homology, both humans and mice contain at least 30 such proteins, which can be divided into 7 separate families (3). The JARID (Jumonji/AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein) family contains four members: JARID1A (also RBP2 and RBBP2), JARID1B (also PLU-1), JARID1C (also SMCX) and JARID1D (also SMCY) (4). In addition to the JmJC domain, these proteins contain JmJN, BRIGHT, C5HC2 zinc-finger, and PHD domains, the latter of which binds to methylated histone H3 (Lys9) (4). All four JARID proteins demethylate di- and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys4; JARID1B also demethylates mono-methyl histone H3 Lys4 (5-7). JARID1A is a critical RB-interacting protein and is required for Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated transcriptional repression during ES cell differentiation (8). A JARID1A-NUP98 gene fusion is associated with myeloid leukemia (9). JARID1B, which interacts with many proteins including c-Myc and HDAC4, may play a role in cell fate decisions by blocking terminal differentiation (10-12). JARID1B is over-expressed in many breast cancers and may act by repressing multiple tumor suppressor genes including BRCA1 and HOXA5 (13,14). JARID1C has been found in a complex with HDAC1, HDAC2, G9a and REST, which binds to and represses REST target genes in non-neuronal cells (7). JARID1C mutations are associated with X-linked mental retardation and epilepsy (15,16). JARID1D is largely uncharacterized.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Lamins and lamin associated proteins are the major components of nuclear lamina found between the inner nuclear membrane and the peripheral chromatin. These proteins play important roles in maintaining nuclear structure, chromatin organization, DNA replication, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis (1-3). Lamins are type V intermediate filaments that are further classified into type A and type B lamin proteins. Type A lamins (including lamin A and the smaller lamin C splice variant) are predominately expressed in terminally differentiated cells, whereas type B lamins (lamin B1, lamin B2) are encoded by distinct genes and are expressed constitutively. Cleavage of lamins by caspases occurs during apoptosis as part of the disassembly of the cell (4-6). A number of lamina-associated proteins contribute to the nuclear lamina and include the lamin B receptor, LAP1, LAP2, emerin, MAN1, otefin, and YA. Several isoforms of lamina-associated polypeptide 2 (LAP2, also known as thymopoietin or TMPO) have been described, with the α, β, and γ isoforms most abundant in humans (7-10). Structurally similar LAP2β and LAP2γ are type II integral membrane proteins. LAP2α has a unique carboxy-terminus that lacks a transmembrane region and results in localization of LAP2α throughout the nucleus where it can associate with lamin A/C (10). LAP2α is also thought to contribute to the nuclear anchorage of retinoblastoma protein (Rb) and control cell cycle progression (11). LAP2α is also targeted for cleavage by caspases, which may contribute to changes in chromatin structure during apoptosis (12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The ZFX (X-linked zinc finger protein) gene is expressed from the inactive X chromosome and is structurally similar to its homologue on the Y chromosome, ZFY (1). Transcripts of ZFX and ZFY encode proteins composed of a highly acidic amino-terminal domain and a carboxy-terminal zinc-finger motif that is commonly associated with nucleic acid-binding proteins (2). Both ZFY and ZFX are probable transcriptional activators and may function in sex determination (3). Multiple alternatively spliced transcript variants of ZFX, encoding different isoforms, have been identified and may be functionally distinct (2). Conditional gene targeting studies in mouse have suggested ZFX is also required for self-renewal of embryonic and hematopoietic stem cells (4). ZFX has also been suggested to play a role in proliferation and expansion of B cells, and could contribute to lymphocyte homeostasis (5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1,2). The p300/CBP histone acetyltransferases acetylate multiple lysine residues in the amino terminal tail of histone H2B (Lys5, 12, 15, and 20) at gene promoters during transcriptional activation (1-3). Hyper-acetylation of the histone tails neutralizes the positive charge of these domains and is believed to weaken histone-DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, thereby destabilizing chromatin structure and increasing the access of DNA to various DNA-binding proteins (4,5). In addition, acetylation of specific lysine residues creates docking sites that facilitate recruitment of many transcription and chromatin regulatory proteins that contain a bromodomain, which binds to acetylated lysine residues (6). Histone H2B is mono-ubiquitinated at Lys120 during transcriptional activation by the RAD6 E2 protein in conjunction with the BRE1A/BRE1B E3 ligase (also known as RNF20/RNF40) (7). Mono-ubiquitinated histone H2B Lys120 is associated with the transcribed region of active genes and stimulates transcriptional elongation by facilitating FACT-dependent chromatin remodeling (7-9). In addition, it is essential for subsequent methylation of histone H3 Lys4 and Lys79, two additional histone modifications that regulate transcriptional initiation and elongation (10). In response to metabolic stress, AMPK is recruited to responsive genes and phosphorylates histone H2B at Lys36, both at promoters and in transcribed regions of genes, and may regulate transcriptional elongation (11). In response to multiple apoptotic stimuli, histone H2B is phosphorylated at Ser14 by the Mst1 kinase (12). Upon induction of apoptosis, Mst1 is cleaved and activated by caspase-3, leading to global phosphorylation of histone H2B during chromatin condensation. Interestingly, histone H2B is rapidly phosphorylated at irradiation-induced DNA damage foci in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (13). In this case, phosphorylation at Ser14 is rapid, depends on prior phosphorylation of H2AX Ser139, and occurs in the absence of apoptosis, suggesting that Ser14 phosphorylation may have distinct roles in DNA-damage repair and apoptosis.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: JunB is a basic region, leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor belonging to the Jun family that includes c-Jun and JunD. Jun family members homodimerize or heterodimerize with Fos and ATF proteins to form a functional transcription factor AP-1 (activator protein 1), whose activity is regulated by a variety of physiological and pathological stimuli such as growth factors, infections, and stress signals (1-4). While JunB sometimes antagonizes c-Jun transcriptional activity, it may functionally substitute for c-Jun during development in mice (5-7). JunB regulates hematopoietic stem cell number and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (8,9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) comprise a family of transcription factors that function within the Jak/Stat pathway to regulate interferon (IFN) and IFN-inducible gene expression in response to viral infection (1). IRFs play an important role in pathogen defense, autoimmunity, lymphocyte development, cell growth, and susceptibility to transformation. The IRF family includes nine members: IRF-1, IRF-2, IRF-9/ISGF3γ, IRF-3, IRF-4 (Pip/LSIRF/ICSAT), IRF-5, IRF-6, IRF-7, and IRF-8/ICSBP. All IRF proteins share homology in their amino-terminal DNA-binding domains. IRF family members regulate transcription through interactions with proteins that share similar DNA-binding motifs, such as IFN-stimulated response elements (ISRE), IFN consensus sequences (ICS), and IFN regulatory elements (IRF-E) (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Basic leucine zipper transcriptional factor ATF-like (BATF) is a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor and is part of the AP-1/ATF family that forms inhibitory dimers with members of the Jun family (1-3). Expression of BATF is largely restricted with highest levels found in mature T cells, and it is induced in B cells following immune responses including viral infection (1,2). BATF expression is also induced by IL-6 via a Stat3-dependent mechanism (4). BATF plays an important role in the differentiation of immune cell lineages (5-7). Studies of BATF-deficient mice have demonstrated a critical role for BATF in the formation of IL-17-expressing Th17 cells, in part, by regulating the expression of IL-17 (5,6). BATF knockouts are resistant to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EEA), consistent with the role of Th17 cells in this model for autoimmunity (5). Additional studies have found that BATF is important in generating antibody class switching. BATF is required for the generation of follicular helper T cells (Tfh), by regulating BCL6 and c-Maf (6,7). In B cells, BATF controls the expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and regulates class-switched antibody responses (7). Taken together, these studies suggest that BATF is a key regulator of distinct populations of immune cells.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1,2). Histone acetylation occurs mainly on the amino-terminal tail domains of histones H2A (Lys5), H2B (Lys5, 12, 15, and 20), H3 (Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, 36 and 56), and H4 (Lys5, 8, 12, and 16) and is important for the regulation of histone deposition, transcriptional activation, DNA replication, recombination, and DNA repair (1-3). Hyper-acetylation of the histone tails neutralizes the positive charge of these domains and is believed to weaken histone-DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, thereby destabilizing chromatin structure and increasing the accessibility of DNA to various DNA-binding proteins (4,5). In addition, acetylation of specific lysine residues creates docking sites for a protein module called the bromodomain, which binds to acetylated lysine residues (6). Many transcription and chromatin regulatory proteins contain bromodomains and may be recruited to gene promoters, in part, through binding of acetylated histone tails. Histone acetylation is mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs), such as CBP/p300, GCN5L2, PCAF, and Tip60, which are recruited to genes by DNA-bound protein factors to facilitate transcriptional activation (3). Deacetylation, which is mediated by histone deacetylases (HDAC and sirtuin proteins), reverses the effects of acetylation and generally facilitates transcriptional repression (7,8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1,2). Histone acetylation occurs mainly on the amino-terminal tail domains of histones H2A (Lys5), H2B (Lys5, 12, 15, and 20), H3 (Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, 36 and 56), and H4 (Lys5, 8, 12, and 16) and is important for the regulation of histone deposition, transcriptional activation, DNA replication, recombination, and DNA repair (1-3). Hyper-acetylation of the histone tails neutralizes the positive charge of these domains and is believed to weaken histone-DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, thereby destabilizing chromatin structure and increasing the accessibility of DNA to various DNA-binding proteins (4,5). In addition, acetylation of specific lysine residues creates docking sites for a protein module called the bromodomain, which binds to acetylated lysine residues (6). Many transcription and chromatin regulatory proteins contain bromodomains and may be recruited to gene promoters, in part, through binding of acetylated histone tails. Histone acetylation is mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs), such as CBP/p300, GCN5L2, PCAF, and Tip60, which are recruited to genes by DNA-bound protein factors to facilitate transcriptional activation (3). Deacetylation, which is mediated by histone deacetylases (HDAC and sirtuin proteins), reverses the effects of acetylation and generally facilitates transcriptional repression (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor family includes the retinoblastoma protein Rb (p105), retinoblastoma-like protein 1 (RBL1, p107), and retinoblastoma-like protein 2 (RBL2, p130). These Rb family proteins are referred to as ‘pocket proteins’ because they contain a conserved binding pocket region that interacts with critical regulatory proteins, including E2F family transcription factors, c-Abl tyrosine kinase, and proteins containing a conserved LXCXE motif (1,2). In quiescent G0 phase cells, active Rb proteins are hypophosphorylated and bind to E2F transcription factors to repress transcription and inhibit cell cycle progression (1,2). Upon growth factor induction of quiescent cells, Rb proteins become hyperphosphorylated and inactivated by G1-phase cyclinD-cdk4/6, G1/S-phase cyclin E-cdk2, and G1/S-phase cyclin A-cdk2 complexes (1,2). Hyperphosphorylation of Rb proteins results in a loss of E2F binding and allows for transcriptional activation and cell cycle progression (1,2). In addition to regulating the cell cycle, Rb proteins regulate chromosome stability, induction, and maintenance of senescence, apoptosis, cellular differentiation, and angiogenesis (3).Retinoblastoma-like protein 2 (RBL2, p130) is the most predominant and active Rb family member found in quiescent cells. In these cells, RBL2 interacts with E2F4 and E2F5 to recruit the DP, RB-like, E2F, and MuvB protein (DREAM) complex to E2F target genes to repress transcription of multiple genes required for progression into S phase and mitosis (4-6). Hypophosphorylation of RBL2 during cellular senescence is required for maintenance of senescent cells (7,8).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Modulation of chromatin structure plays an important role in the regulation of transcription in eukaryotes. The nucleosome, made up of DNA wound around eight core histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin (1). The amino-terminal tails of core histones undergo various post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (2-5). These modifications occur in response to various stimuli and have a direct effect on the accessibility of chromatin to transcription factors and, therefore, gene expression (6). In most species, histone H2B is primarily acetylated at Lys5, 12, 15, and 20 (4,7). Histone H3 is primarily acetylated at Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, and 56. Acetylation of H3 at Lys9 appears to have a dominant role in histone deposition and chromatin assembly in some organisms (2,3). Phosphorylation at Ser10, Ser28, and Thr11 of histone H3 is tightly correlated with chromosome condensation during both mitosis and meiosis (8-10). Phosphorylation at Thr3 of histone H3 is highly conserved among many species and is catalyzed by the kinase haspin. Immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies in mammalian cells reveals mitotic phosphorylation at Thr3 of H3 in prophase and its dephosphorylation during anaphase (11).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1,2). Histone acetylation occurs mainly on the amino-terminal tail domains of histones H2A (Lys5), H2B (Lys5, 12, 15, and 20), H3 (Lys9, 14, 18, 23, 27, 36 and 56), and H4 (Lys5, 8, 12, and 16) and is important for the regulation of histone deposition, transcriptional activation, DNA replication, recombination, and DNA repair (1-3). Hyper-acetylation of the histone tails neutralizes the positive charge of these domains and is believed to weaken histone-DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, thereby destabilizing chromatin structure and increasing the accessibility of DNA to various DNA-binding proteins (4,5). In addition, acetylation of specific lysine residues creates docking sites for a protein module called the bromodomain, which binds to acetylated lysine residues (6). Many transcription and chromatin regulatory proteins contain bromodomains and may be recruited to gene promoters, in part, through binding of acetylated histone tails. Histone acetylation is mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs), such as CBP/p300, GCN5L2, PCAF, and Tip60, which are recruited to genes by DNA-bound protein factors to facilitate transcriptional activation (3). Deacetylation, which is mediated by histone deacetylases (HDAC and sirtuin proteins), reverses the effects of acetylation and generally facilitates transcriptional repression (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The mediator complex consists of about 25-30 proteins and is thought to facilitate transcription activation by acting as a molecular bridge between the RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) machinery and transcription factors (1). Mediator is recruited to target genes by transcription factors and plays an essential role in the recruitment and stabilization of the RNAPII transcription complex at promoters, as well as the activation of transcription post RNAPII recruitment (1-5). The mediator complex also plays an important role in creating ‘chromatin loops’ that occur as a result of interactions between the transcription factor bound at distal enhancers and RNAPII bound at the proximal promoter, and works to sustain proper chromatin architecture during active transcription (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SPT6 or SUPT6H is a histone H3 chaperone protein involved in transcriptional elongation and chromatin structure (1). The SPT6 protein contains a highly acidic N-terminus with leucine zipper and SH2 domains, which can interact with phospho-Rpb1 CTD (Ser2) to recruit SPN1 and other mRNA processing and export factors (2). SPT6 can enhance the elongation rate of RNA polymerase II, and can also maintain the modification state of histone H3 tails. (3-4). Loss of SPT6 causes improper initiation of transcription within coding regions (5).