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Polyclonal Antibody Immunoprecipitation Calcium-Dependent Cell-Cell Adhesion

$260
100 µl
$630
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that belongs to the HER/ErbB protein family. Ligand binding results in receptor dimerization, autophosphorylation, activation of downstream signaling, internalization, and lysosomal degradation (1,2). Phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) at Tyr845 in the kinase domain is implicated in stabilizing the activation loop, maintaining the active state enzyme, and providing a binding surface for substrate proteins (3,4). c-Src is involved in phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr845 (5). The SH2 domain of PLCγ binds at phospho-Tyr992, resulting in activation of PLCγ-mediated downstream signaling (6). Phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1045 creates a major docking site for the adaptor protein c-Cbl, leading to receptor ubiquitination and degradation following EGFR activation (7,8). The GRB2 adaptor protein binds activated EGFR at phospho-Tyr1068 (9). A pair of phosphorylated EGFR residues (Tyr1148 and Tyr1173) provide a docking site for the Shc scaffold protein, with both sites involved in MAP kinase signaling activation (2). Phosphorylation of EGFR at specific serine and threonine residues attenuates EGFR kinase activity. EGFR carboxy-terminal residues Ser1046 and Ser1047 are phosphorylated by CaM kinase II; mutation of either of these serines results in upregulated EGFR tyrosine autophosphorylation (10).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that belongs to the HER/ErbB protein family. Ligand binding results in receptor dimerization, autophosphorylation, activation of downstream signaling, internalization, and lysosomal degradation (1,2). Phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) at Tyr845 in the kinase domain is implicated in stabilizing the activation loop, maintaining the active state enzyme, and providing a binding surface for substrate proteins (3,4). c-Src is involved in phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr845 (5). The SH2 domain of PLCγ binds at phospho-Tyr992, resulting in activation of PLCγ-mediated downstream signaling (6). Phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1045 creates a major docking site for the adaptor protein c-Cbl, leading to receptor ubiquitination and degradation following EGFR activation (7,8). The GRB2 adaptor protein binds activated EGFR at phospho-Tyr1068 (9). A pair of phosphorylated EGFR residues (Tyr1148 and Tyr1173) provide a docking site for the Shc scaffold protein, with both sites involved in MAP kinase signaling activation (2). Phosphorylation of EGFR at specific serine and threonine residues attenuates EGFR kinase activity. EGFR carboxy-terminal residues Ser1046 and Ser1047 are phosphorylated by CaM kinase II; mutation of either of these serines results in upregulated EGFR tyrosine autophosphorylation (10).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The c-Abl proto-oncogene encodes a nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase that is ubiquitously expressed and highly conserved in metazoan evolution. c-Abl protein is distributed in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm of cells. It is implicated in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, cell adhesion, and stress responses (1-3). c-Abl kinase activity is increased in vivo by diverse physiological stimuli including integrin activation; PDGF stimulation; and binding to c-Jun, Nck, and RFX1 (2,4). The in vivo mechanism for regulation of c-Abl kinase activity is not completely understood. Tyr245 is located in the linker region between the SH2 and catalytic domains. This positioning is conserved among Abl family members. Phosphorylation at Tyr245 is involved in the activation of c-Abl kinase (5). In addition, phosphorylation at Tyr412, which is located in the kinase activation loop of c-Abl, is required for kinase activity (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) plays a central role in many signal transduction pathways (1,2) including the activation of Akt and the PKC isoenzymes p70 S6 kinase and RSK (3). Through its effects on these kinases, PDK1 is involved in the regulation of a wide variety of processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ajuba belongs to the Zyxin/Ajuba family, members of which include LIMD1, LPP, Trip6 and Zyxin. Three LIM domains at the carboxy-terminus characterize this family of proteins. Zyxin/Ajuba family members associate with the actin cytoskeleton, are components of both cell-cell junction adhesive complex and integrin-mediated adhesive complex, and shuttle in and out of the nucleus (1). Ajuba is involved in Rac activation during cell migration and activates Aurora A in order to commit to mitosis (2-3). Ajuba and its family members also have an amino-terminal proline-rich pre-LIM region, and Ajuba augments ERK activation in a Ras-dependent manner (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Angiotensinogen (AGT) is the primary precursor of angiotensins, peptide hormones that play a central role in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) (1-3). AGT is a secreted protein synthesized primarily by the liver and secreted into circulation. Upon binding to renin, the amino terminal fragment of AGT is cleaved and released as a decapeptide hormone termed angiotensin 1 (Ang I). Ang I is subsequently processed by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) to generate angiotensin II (Ang II), which acts on AT1 and AT2 receptors in the central nervous system to increase production of anti-diuretic hormone (ADH), while promoting vasoconstriction in the peripheral circulation (4). Aberrant upregulation of Ang II has been associated with numerous clinical conditions, including hypertension, atherosclerosis, myocardial hypertrophy, and obesity (5-7). Alternative cleavage products of Ang I (e.g., Ang 1-7) can also be generated by ACE2 cleavage, some of which display biological functions that are distinct from Ang II (8). Treatments that target the RAS (e.g., ACE inhibitors) are consequently of significant importance in the treatment of hypertensive and hypertensive-related disorders(5-8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), one of the major caspase-1 targets, is a multifunctional cytokine that is involved in a host of immune and proinflammatory responses (1). It is produced primarily by activated monocytes and macrophages. It signals through various adaptor proteins and kinases that lead to activation of numerous downstream targets (2-6). Human IL-1β is synthesized as a 31 kDa precursor. To gain activity, the precursor must be cleaved by caspase-1 between Asp116 and Ala117 to yield a 17 kDa mature form (7,8). Detection of the 17 kDa mature form of IL-1β is a good indicator of caspase-1 activity.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Presenilin 1 and presenilin 2 are transmembrane proteins belonging to the presenilin family. Mutation of presenilin genes has been linked to early onset of Alzheimer disease, probably due to presenilin's associated γ-secretase activity for amyloid-β protein processing (1,2). Endogenous presenilin mainly exists in a heterodimeric complex formed from the endoproteolytically processed amino-terminal (34 kDa) and carboxy-terminal (~20, 22, 23 kDa) fragments (CTF) (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are serine/threonine kinases that are activated by cyclins and govern eukaryotic cell cycle progression. While CDK5 shares high sequence homology with its family members, it is thought mainly to function in postmitotic neurons to regulate the cytoarchitecture of these cells. Analogous to cyclins, the regulatory subunits p35 and p39 associate with and activate CDK5 despite the lack of sequence homology. CDK5 is ubiquitously expressed, with high levels of kinase activity detected primarily in the nervous system due to the narrow expression pattern of p35 and p39 in post-mitotic neurons. A large number of CDK5 substrates have been identified although no substrates have been specifically attributed to p35 or p39. Substrates of CDK5 include p35, PAK1, Src, β-catenin, tau, neurofilament-H, neurofilament-M, synapsin-1, APP, DARPP32, PP1-inhibitor, and Rb. p35 is rapidly degraded (T1/2 <20 min) by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (1). However, p35 stability increases as CDK5 kinase activity decreases, likely as a result of decreased phosphorylation of p35 at Thr138 by CDK5 (2). Proteolytic cleavage of p35 by calpain produces p25 upon neurotoxic insult, resulting in prolonged activation of CDK5 by p25. Research studies have shown accumulation of p25 in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (3,4).