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Polyclonal Antibody Immunoprecipitation Regulation of Cell Cycle

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Pumilio 1 and Pumilio 2 (PUM1, PUM2, or Pumilio homolog 1 and 2, respectively) are evolutionarily conserved RNA binding proteins that are thought to repress translation and stability of mRNA targets by binding to the 3'-UTR of specific RNA sequences (1). Pumilio proteins have been implicated in the regulation of genes involved in embryogenesis and germline cell development (2). Research studies have shown that PUM2 may have a role in neural stem cell fate decisions (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Three distinct PCTAIRE isoforms (PCTAIRE 1, PCTAIRE 2 and PCTAIRE 3) have been identified in humans and belong to the CDK family of serine/threonine protein kinases. These proteins have a core kinase domain flanked by unique amino- and carboxy-terminal domains. CDK proteins are known to regulate the cell cycle. All three PCTAIRE isoforms are abundantly expressed and catalytically active in post-mitotic brain, suggesting that they may function in processes other than cell division (1). PCTAIRE 1 is a cytoplasmic phosphoprotein whose kinase activity peaks in G2 and S phase (2). While one study indicates that noncovalent interactions with a regulatory component (such as a cyclin) are necessary for catalytic activity of PCTAIRE 1, others show that the monomeric protein is fully active (3). The Cdk5/p25 complex phosphorylates PCTAIRE 1 at Ser95, enhancing its kinase activity (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2 kinase. The critical regulatory step in activating cdc2 during progression into mitosis appears to be dephosphorylation of Tyr15 and Thr14 (1,2). Phosphorylation at Tyr15 and Thr14 and inhibition of cdc2 is carried out by Wee1 and Myt1 protein kinases, while Tyr15 dephosphorylation and activation of cdc2 is carried out by the cdc25 phosphatase (1,3,4). Hyperphosphorylation and inactivation of Myt1 in mitosis suggests that one or more kinases activated at the G2/M transition negatively regulates Myt1 activity. Kinases shown to phosphorylate Myt1 include cdc2, p90RSK, Akt, and Plk1 (5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin-dependent kinase 12 (CDK12/CRKRS/CRK7) is composed of a central CTD kinase domain, several proline-rich regions, and several amino-terminal arginine/serine (RS) motifs common to splicing factors (1). CDK12 is ubiquitously expressed and forms a complex with cyclin K that regulates phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (1-4). CDK12 is important for expression of a subset of long genes with high numbers of exons including some regulators of the DNA damage response, such as breast and ovarian cancer type 1 susceptibility protein 1 (BRCA1) and ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) (3). Depletion of CDK12 results in spontaneous DNA damage and increased sensitivity to DNA damage agents (3). Research studies have shown that CDK12 is recurrently mutated in high-grade ovarian cancer (5,6). In addition, high levels of CDK12 are required to maintain pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TDP43 (TAR DNA-binding protein 43) is involved in transcriptional regulation and exon splicing (1,2). While normal TDP43 is a nuclear protein, pathological TDP43 is a component of insoluble aggregates in patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In these disorders, TDP43 is abnormally ubiquitinated, phosphorylated and cleaved to generate carboxy-terminal fragments that are sequestered as insoluble aggregates in neuronal nuclei, perikarya, and neurites (3,4). Additionally, TDP43 inhibits the expression of the HIV-1 gene and regulates CFTR gene splicing (1,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The initiation of DNA replication in mammalian cells is a highly coordinated process that ensures duplication of the genome only once per cell division cycle. Origins of replication are dispersed throughout the genome and their activities are regulated via the sequential binding of pre-replication and replication factors. The origin recognition complex (ORC) is thought to be bound to chromatin throughout the cell cycle (1,2). The pre-replication complex (pre-RC) forms in late mitosis/early G1 phase beginning with the binding of CDT1 and cdc6 to the origin, which allows binding of the heterohexameric MCM2-7 complex. Once this complex is formed, the origin is “licensed” for initiation of DNA replication. In order to ensure that replication occurs only once per cell cycle, geminin binds to and inhibits CDT1 during the S, G2 and M phases. This prevents the recruitment of the MCM complex to the origins of replication, which blocks the premature reformation of the Pre-RC. At the metaphase/anaphase transition, geminin is degraded by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC) allowing for the formation of new pre-RC (3,4).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: BAP1 (BRCA1-Associated Protein 1) was originally identified as a BRCA1 associated, nuclear localized ubiquitin hydrolase that suppresses cell growth (1). The protein belongs to the UCH family of deubiquitinases, with a UCH domain in its N-terminal segment and a BRCA1 interaction domain as well as a nuclear localization signal in its C-terminal segment (1). Frequent gene locus rearrangement, deletion and null mutation of BAP1 have been found in lung and breast cancers (1,2). Mutation analysis in vivo in cancer cell line survival and in animal tumorigenesis indicate that both the deubiquitinase activity and the nuclear localization signal are required for BAP1 function as a tumor suppressor (3). BAP1 does not have direct deubiquitination activity towards the autoubiquitinyled BRCA1/BARD1 E3 complex (4), but its interaction with BARD1 inhibits BRCA1/BARD1 E3 activity by interfering with the compex dimerization process (5). In addition to its interaction with BRCA1/BARD1, BAP1 has also been shown to interact with and deubiquitinylate HCF-1, thereby controlling its stability (6).Phosphorylation of Ser592 on BAP1 was identified at Cell Signaling Technology (CST) using PhosphoScan®, CST's LC-MS/MS platform for phosphorylation site discovery (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The COP9 Signalosome (CSN) is a ubiquitously expressed multiprotein complex that is involved in a vast array of cellular and developmental processes, which is thought to be attributed to its control over the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Typically, the CSN is composed of eight highly conserved subunits (CSN1-CSN8), each of which is homologous to one of the eight subunits that form the lid of the 26S proteasome particle, suggesting that these complexes have a common evolutionary ancestor (1). CSN was first identified in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with a light-grown seedling phenotype when grown in the dark (2-4). The subsequent cloning of the constitutive morphogenesis 9 (cop9) mutant from Arabidopsis thaliana was soon followed by the biochemical purification of the COP9-containing multiprotein complex (4). It is now widely accepted that the CSN directly interacts with cullin-RING ligase (CRL) families of ubiquitin E3 complexes, and that CSN is required for their proper function (5). In addition, CSN may also regulate protein homeostasis through its association with protein kinases and deubiquitinating enzymes. Collectively, these activities position the CSN as a pivotal regulator of the DNA-damage response, cell-cycle control, and gene expression (1).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin E1 and cyclin E2 can associate with and activate CDK2 (1). Upon DNA damage, upregulation/activation of the CDK inhibitors p21 Waf1/Cip1 and p27 Kip1 prevent cyclin E/CDK2 activation, resulting in G1/S arrest. When conditions are favorable for cell cycle progression, cyclin D/CDK4/6 phosphorylates Rb and is thought to reduce the activity of p21 Waf1/Cip1 and p27 Kip1, allowing subsequent activation of cyclin E/CDK2 (1,2). Cyclin E/CDK2 further phosphorylates Rb to allow progression into S-phase, where cyclin E/CDK2 is thought to phosphorylate and activate multiple proteins involved in DNA synthesis (2,3). Turnover of cyclin E is largely controlled by phosphorylation that results in SCFFbw7-mediated ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation (4,5). Cyclin E1 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo including Thr62, Ser88, Ser72, Thr380 and Ser384, and is controlled by at least two kinases, CDK2 and GSK-3 (6,7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tuberin is a product of the TSC2 tumor suppressor gene and an important regulator of cell proliferation and tumor development (1). Mutations in either TSC2 or the related TSC1 (hamartin) gene cause tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by development of multiple, widespread non-malignant tumors (2). Tuberin is directly phosphorylated at Thr1462 by Akt/PKB (3). Phosphorylation at Thr1462 and Tyr1571 regulates tuberin-hamartin complexes and tuberin activity (3-5). In addition, tuberin inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which promotes inhibition of p70 S6 kinase, activation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1, an inhibitor of translation initiation), and eventual inhibition of translation (3,6,7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Circadian rhythms govern many key physiological processes that fluctuate with a period of approximately 24 hours. These processes include the sleep-wake cycle, glucose, lipid and drug metabolism, heart rate, hormone secretion, renal blood flow, and body temperature, as well as basic cellular processes such as DNA repair and the timing of the cell division cycle (1,2). The mammalian circadian system consists of many individual tissue-specific clocks (peripheral clocks) that are controlled by a master circadian pacemaker residing in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the brain (1,2). The periodic circadian rhythm is prominently manifested by the light-dark cycle, which is sensed by the visual system and processed by the SCN. The SCN processes the light-dark information and synchronizes peripheral clocks through neural and humoral output signals (1,2).The cellular circadian clockwork consists of interwoven positive and negative regulatory loops, or limbs (1,2). The positive limb includes the CLOCK and BMAL1 proteins, two basic helix-loop-helix-PAS containing transcription factors that bind E box enhancer elements and activate transcription of their target genes. CLOCK is a histone acetyltransferase (HAT) protein, which acetylates both histone H3 and H4 (3). BMAL1 binds to CLOCK and enhances its HAT activity (3). The CLOCK/BMAL1 dimer exhibits a periodic oscillation in both nuclear/cytoplasmic localization and protein levels, both of which are regulated by phosphorylation (4,5). CLOCK/BMAL1 target genes include the Cry and Per genes, whose proteins form the negative limb of the circadian clockwork system (1,2). CRY and PER proteins (CRY1, CRY2, PER1, PER2 and PER3) form oligomers that also periodically shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. When in the nucleus, CRY/PER proteins inhibit CLOCK/BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activation, thus completing the circadian transcriptional loop (1,2). In tissues, roughly six to eight percent of all genes exhibit a circadian expression pattern (1,2). This 24-hour periodicity in gene expression results from coordination of the positive and negative regulatory limbs of the cellular clockwork system, and is fine-tuned by outside signals received from the SCN.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the F-box family of proteins are characterized by the approximate 40 amino acid F-box motif named after cyclin F (1,2). F-box proteins constitute one of the four subunits of the Skp1-Cullin-F-box (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complex. The substrate specificity of SCF complexes is determined by the interchangeable F-box proteins, which act as adaptors by associating with phosphorylated substrate proteins and recruiting them to the SCF core. F-box proteins contain two fundamental domains: the F-box motif mediates binding to Skp1 and a leucine rich repeat (LRR) domain mediates substrate interactions.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Host cell factor C1 (HCFC1) was first identified as the host cell factor for human herpes simplex virus infection. HCFC1 and the viral protein VP16 belong to a multi-protein complex that promotes transcription of viral immediate early genes (1). The relatively large HCFC1 protein contains 6 centrally located 26 amino acid repeats that can be O-GlcNAcylated and subjected to O-linked beta-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT) cleavage (2-4). The resulting amino-terminal (HCFC1-N) and carboxy-terminal (HCFC1-C) fragments are non-covalently associated and play important roles in cell cycle regulation. The HCFC1-N peptide facilitates progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle while HCFC1-C enables proper mitosis and cytokinesis during the M phase (5-7). As HCFC1 plays an important role in neurodevelopment, mutations in the corresponding gene are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g., intellectual disability) in humans (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: LRP5 and LRP6 are single-pass transmembrane proteins belonging to the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-related protein family. Unlike other members of the LDLR family, LRP5 and LRP6 have four EGF and three LDLR repeats in the extracellular domain, and proline-rich motifs in the cytoplasmic domain (1). They function as co-receptors for Wnt and are required for the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway (2,3). LRP5 and LRP6 are highly homologous and have redundant roles during development (4,5). The activity of LRP5 and LRP6 can be inhibited by the binding of some members of the Dickkopf (DKK) family of proteins (6,7). Upon stimulation with Wnt, LRP6 is phosphorylated at multiple sites including Thr1479, Ser1490, and Thr1493 by kinases such as GSK-3 and CK1 (8-10). Phosphorylated LRP6 recruits axin to the membrane and presumably activates β-catenin signaling (8-10).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder that causes symptoms including hamartomas in brain, kidney, heart, lung and skin (1). The tumor suppressor genes TSC1 and TSC2 encode hamartin and tuberin, respectively (2,3). Hamartin and tuberin form a functional complex and are involved in numerous cellular activities such as vesicular trafficking, regulation of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, steroid hormone regulation, Rho activation and anchoring neuronal intermediate filaments to the actin cytoskeleton (4-9). The combination of genetic, biochemical and cell-biological studies demonstrate that the tuberin/hamartin complex functions as a GTPase-activating protein for the Ras-related small G protein Rheb and thus inhibits targets of rapamycin including mTOR. Cells lacking hamartin or tuberin fail to inhibit phosphorylation of S6 kinase resulting in the activation of S6 ribosomal protein's translation of 5'TOP mRNA transcripts (10). Hamartin is phosphorylated by CDK1 (cdc2) at Thr417, Ser584 and Thr1047 in cells in G2/M phase of the cell cycle (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bim/Bod is a pro-apoptotic protein belonging to the BH3-only group of Bcl-2 family members including Bad, Bid, Bik, Hrk, and Noxa that contain a BH3 domain but lack other conserved BH1 or BH2 domains (1,2). Bim induces apoptosis by binding to and antagonizing anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family. Interactions have been observed with Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, Bcl-w, Bfl-1, and BHRF-1 (1,2). Bim functions in regulating apoptosis associated with thymocyte negative selection and following growth factor withdrawal, during which Bim expression is elevated (3-6). Three major isoforms of Bim are generated by alternative splicing: BimEL, BimL, and BimS (1). The shortest form, BimS, is the most cytotoxic and is generally only transiently expressed during apoptosis. The BimEL and BimL isoforms may be sequestered to the dynein motor complex through an interaction with the dynein light chain and released from this complex during apoptosis (7). Apoptotic activity of these longer isoforms may be regulated by phosphorylation (8,9). Environmental stress triggers Bim phosphorylation by JNK and results in its dissociation from the dynein complex and increased apoptotic activity.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dicer is a member of the RNase III family that specifically cleaves double-stranded RNAs to generate microRNAs (miRNAs) (1). After long primary transcript pri-miRNAs are processed to stem-looped pre-miRNAs by Drosha (2), pre-miRNAs are transported to the cytoplasm and further processed by Dicer to produce 22-nucleotide mature miRNAs (3). The mature miRNA then becomes a part of the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) and can bind to the 3' UTR of the target mRNA (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 90 kDa ribosomal S6 kinases (RSK1-4) are a family of widely expressed Ser/Thr kinases characterized by two nonidentical, functional kinase domains (1) and a carboxy-terminal docking site for extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) (2). Several sites both within and outside of the RSK kinase domain, including Ser380, Thr359, Ser363, and Thr573, are important for kinase activation (3). RSK1-3 are activated via coordinated phosphorylation by MAPKs, autophosphorylation, and phosphoinositide-3-OH kinase (PI3K) in response to many growth factors, polypeptide hormones, and neurotransmitters (3).