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Rat Negative Regulation of Transcription

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: ETO belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved nuclear factors. Although it has no DNA binding domains it is reported to act as a transcriptional corepressor (1). It is best characterized as the fusion partner of AML1 in acute myeloid leukemia with the t(8;21) translocation which gives rise to the AML-ETO fusion protein (2). AML1 is a transcription factor that is involved in the differentiation of all hematopoietic lineages. The fusion protein lacks the activation domain of AML1 and behaves as a dominant negative AML1, repressing AML1 target genes. AML-ETO also causes activation of other genes through a mechanism that involves Bcl-2 and enhanced expression of p21 waf1/cip1 (3,4). The AML-ETO fusion protein is thought to cause the expansion of a hematopoietic stem cell population that has limited lineage commitment and genomic instability (5). Recent evidence derived from chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments has demonstrated that ETO may play a role in the regulation of Notch target genes, and AML-ETO has been shown to disrupt repression of Notch target genes (6). Therefore, both AML and Notch target genes are deregulated by AML-ETO. Epigenetic silencing of the microRNA-223 gene has also been attributed to activities of AML-ETO, contributing to the differentiation block in t(8;21) leukemia (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr)-binding protein (VPRBP, DCAF1) is a substrate-specific adaptor for the CUL4-based ubiquitin ligase complex that consists of CUL4A, RBX1, and DDB1 (1). VPRBP protein structure contains a central LIS1 homology (LisH) motif responsible for dimerization, and two carboxy-terminal WD-40 motifs involved in Vpr and DDB1 binding (2-4). Research studies demonstrate that VPRBP plays a role in hepatic lipid metabolism by promoting the ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation of the TR4 nuclear receptor, which is involved in lipid homeostasis (5). The VPRBP protein plays a role in mammalian germ cell development through regulation of TET methylcytosine dioxygenase activation (6). Additional studies show that VPRBP exhibits kinase activity and phosphorylates histone H2A at Ser120, which blocks tumor suppressor gene transcription (7). The tumor suppressor Merlin/NF2 inhibits tumorigenesis through interaction with and suppression of the CUL4A-RBX1-DDB1-VPRBP complex (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Fos family of nuclear oncogenes includes c-Fos, FosB, Fos-related antigen 1 (FRA1), and Fos-related antigen 2 (FRA2) (1). While most Fos proteins exist as a single isoform, the FosB protein exists as two isoforms: full-length FosB and a shorter form, FosB2 (Delta FosB), which lacks the carboxy-terminal 101 amino acids (1-3). The expression of Fos proteins is rapidly and transiently induced by a variety of extracellular stimuli including growth factors, cytokines, neurotransmitters, polypeptide hormones, and stress. Fos proteins dimerize with Jun proteins (c-Jun, JunB, and JunD) to form Activator Protein-1 (AP-1), a transcription factor that binds to TRE/AP-1 elements and activates transcription. Fos and Jun proteins contain the leucine-zipper motif that mediates dimerization and an adjacent basic domain that binds to DNA. The various Fos/Jun heterodimers differ in their ability to transactivate AP-1 dependent genes. In addition to increased expression, phosphorylation of Fos proteins by Erk kinases in response to extracellular stimuli may further increase transcriptional activity (4-6). Phosphorylation of c-Fos at Ser32 and Thr232 by Erk5 increases protein stability and nuclear localization (5). Phosphorylation of FRA1 at Ser252 and Ser265 by Erk1/2 increases protein stability and leads to overexpression of FRA1 in cancer cells (6). Following growth factor stimulation, expression of FosB and c-Fos in quiescent fibroblasts is immediate, but very short-lived, with protein levels dissipating after several hours (7). FRA1 and FRA2 expression persists longer, and appreciable levels can be detected in asynchronously growing cells (8). Deregulated expression of c-Fos, FosB, or FRA2 can result in neoplastic cellular transformation; however, Delta FosB lacks the ability to transform cells (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Fos family of nuclear oncogenes includes c-Fos, FosB, Fos-related antigen 1 (FRA1), and Fos-related antigen 2 (FRA2) (1). While most Fos proteins exist as a single isoform, the FosB protein exists as two isoforms: full-length FosB and a shorter form, FosB2 (Delta FosB), which lacks the carboxy-terminal 101 amino acids (1-3). The expression of Fos proteins is rapidly and transiently induced by a variety of extracellular stimuli including growth factors, cytokines, neurotransmitters, polypeptide hormones, and stress. Fos proteins dimerize with Jun proteins (c-Jun, JunB, and JunD) to form Activator Protein-1 (AP-1), a transcription factor that binds to TRE/AP-1 elements and activates transcription. Fos and Jun proteins contain the leucine-zipper motif that mediates dimerization and an adjacent basic domain that binds to DNA. The various Fos/Jun heterodimers differ in their ability to transactivate AP-1 dependent genes. In addition to increased expression, phosphorylation of Fos proteins by Erk kinases in response to extracellular stimuli may further increase transcriptional activity (4-6). Phosphorylation of c-Fos at Ser32 and Thr232 by Erk5 increases protein stability and nuclear localization (5). Phosphorylation of FRA1 at Ser252 and Ser265 by Erk1/2 increases protein stability and leads to overexpression of FRA1 in cancer cells (6). Following growth factor stimulation, expression of FosB and c-Fos in quiescent fibroblasts is immediate, but very short-lived, with protein levels dissipating after several hours (7). FRA1 and FRA2 expression persists longer, and appreciable levels can be detected in asynchronously growing cells (8). Deregulated expression of c-Fos, FosB, or FRA2 can result in neoplastic cellular transformation; however, Delta FosB lacks the ability to transform cells (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Myc/Max/Mad network function as transcriptional regulators with roles in various aspects of cell behavior including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (1). These proteins share a common basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) motif required for dimerization and DNA-binding. Max was originally discovered based on its ability to associate with c-Myc and found to be required for the ability of Myc to bind DNA and activate transcription (2). Subsequently, Max has been viewed as a central component of the transcriptional network, forming homodimers as well as heterodimers with other members of the Myc and Mad families (1). The association between Max and either Myc or Mad can have opposing effects on transcriptional regulation and cell behavior (1). The Mad family consists of four related proteins; Mad1, Mad2 (Mxi1), Mad3 and Mad4, and the more distantly related members of the bHLH-ZIP family, Mnt and Mga. Like Myc, the Mad proteins are tightly regulated with short half-lives. In general, Mad family members interfere with Myc-mediated processes such as proliferation, transformation and prevention of apoptosis by inhibiting transcription (3,4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein ubiquitination and deubiquitination are reversible processes catalyzed by ubiquitinating enzymes (UBEs) and deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) respectively (1,2). DUBs are categorized into five subfamilies-USP, UCH, OTU, MJD, and JAMM. Ubiquitin-specific protease 9, X-linked (USP9X) possesses a well-conserved catalytic domain with cysteine peptidase activity, which allows for cleavage of ubiquitin and polyubiquitin conjugates. USP9X is the mammalian homolog of the Drosophila fat-facets (faf) gene, which is essential for normal eye development and viability of the early fly embryo (3,4). While USP9X expression is also critical for normal mammalian development (5-7), many of its substrates are only beginning to be elucidated. There is mounting evidence that USP9X functions in the formation of epithelial cell-cell contacts through deubiquitination-dependent stabilization of molecules involved in maintaining the integrity of both adherens and tight junctions. Indeed, USP9X has been found to associate with AF-6, the β-catenin-E-cadherin complex, and EFA6 (8-11). Research studies have also demonstrated that USP9X is an integral component of the TGF-β/BMP signaling cascade by opposing TRIM33-mediated monoubiquitination of SMAD4 (12). USP9X is overexpressed in a variety of human cancers and contributes to enhanced cell survival, in part, through its ability to deubiquitinate and stabilize the Mcl-1 oncoprotein (13). There is some evidence, however, that suggests the role of USP9X in tumorigenesis is context dependent. Research studies have implicated USP9X in a tumor suppressor role during the early stages of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and in an oncogenic role during advanced stages of PDAC (14,15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF) belongs to the NR2 subfamily of the nuclear hormone receptor family (1). COUP-TFI and COUP-TFII are two of the well-characterized members in the NR2 subfamily. These two members are highly conserved in their two zinc-finger DNA binding domains (DBD) and the ligand binding domain (LBD), and function as repressors or activators of downstream target genes to regulate different biological processes (1-3). COUP-TFI and II bind to 5'-AGGTCA-3' motif palindromes, either directly or indirectly, through heterodimer formation with other proteins (e.g. RXRs) to regulate downstream target gene expression (4,5). COUP-TFI is involved in neuronal development, tissue patterning, and differentiation (6-8). COUP-TFII has been shown to be involved in angiogenesis, glucose homeostasis, and mesenchymal cell commitment (9-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Fos family of nuclear oncogenes includes c-Fos, FosB, Fos-related antigen 1 (FRA1), and Fos-related antigen 2 (FRA2) (1). While most Fos proteins exist as a single isoform, the FosB protein exists as two isoforms: full-length FosB and a shorter form, FosB2 (Delta FosB), which lacks the carboxy-terminal 101 amino acids (1-3). The expression of Fos proteins is rapidly and transiently induced by a variety of extracellular stimuli including growth factors, cytokines, neurotransmitters, polypeptide hormones, and stress. Fos proteins dimerize with Jun proteins (c-Jun, JunB, and JunD) to form Activator Protein-1 (AP-1), a transcription factor that binds to TRE/AP-1 elements and activates transcription. Fos and Jun proteins contain the leucine-zipper motif that mediates dimerization and an adjacent basic domain that binds to DNA. The various Fos/Jun heterodimers differ in their ability to transactivate AP-1 dependent genes. In addition to increased expression, phosphorylation of Fos proteins by Erk kinases in response to extracellular stimuli may further increase transcriptional activity (4-6). Phosphorylation of c-Fos at Ser32 and Thr232 by Erk5 increases protein stability and nuclear localization (5). Phosphorylation of FRA1 at Ser252 and Ser265 by Erk1/2 increases protein stability and leads to overexpression of FRA1 in cancer cells (6). Following growth factor stimulation, expression of FosB and c-Fos in quiescent fibroblasts is immediate, but very short-lived, with protein levels dissipating after several hours (7). FRA1 and FRA2 expression persists longer, and appreciable levels can be detected in asynchronously growing cells (8). Deregulated expression of c-Fos, FosB, or FRA2 can result in neoplastic cellular transformation; however, Delta FosB lacks the ability to transform cells (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein ubiquitination and deubiquitination are reversible processes catalyzed by ubiquitinating enzymes (UBEs) and deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) respectively (1,2). DUBs are categorized into five subfamilies-USP, UCH, OTU, MJD, and JAMM. Ubiquitin-specific protease 9, X-linked (USP9X) possesses a well-conserved catalytic domain with cysteine peptidase activity, which allows for cleavage of ubiquitin and polyubiquitin conjugates. USP9X is the mammalian homolog of the Drosophila fat-facets (faf) gene, which is essential for normal eye development and viability of the early fly embryo (3,4). While USP9X expression is also critical for normal mammalian development (5-7), many of its substrates are only beginning to be elucidated. There is mounting evidence that USP9X functions in the formation of epithelial cell-cell contacts through deubiquitination-dependent stabilization of molecules involved in maintaining the integrity of both adherens and tight junctions. Indeed, USP9X has been found to associate with AF-6, the β-catenin-E-cadherin complex, and EFA6 (8-11). Research studies have also demonstrated that USP9X is an integral component of the TGF-β/BMP signaling cascade by opposing TRIM33-mediated monoubiquitination of SMAD4 (12). USP9X is overexpressed in a variety of human cancers and contributes to enhanced cell survival, in part, through its ability to deubiquitinate and stabilize the Mcl-1 oncoprotein (13). There is some evidence, however, that suggests the role of USP9X in tumorigenesis is context dependent. Research studies have implicated USP9X in a tumor suppressor role during the early stages of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and in an oncogenic role during advanced stages of PDAC (14,15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Death associated protein 1 (DAP1) is a 15 kDa protein that functions as a positive mediator of cell death initiated by interferon-gamma (1, 2). The DAP1 protein is proline rich and possesses one SH3 binding motif, as well as several consensus protein kinase phosphorylation sites (1). The protein is localized in the cytoplasm, but the detailed mechanism of its proapoptotic function is unclear. Death associated protein 3 (DAP3) is widely expressed, and the expression is upregulated during membrane receptor-mediated apoptosis. In interferon-gamma- and Fas-induced apoptosis, DAP3 acts as a positive mediator, functioning downstream of the receptor signaling complex and upstream of the effector caspases (3,4). Death associated protein 5 (DAP5) is a 97 kDa protein with a high degree of amino acid sequence homology to eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (Elf4G) (1,5). Compared with elF4G, DAP5 lacks the amino-terminal region necessary for cap-dependent translation, and has a unique carboxy-terminal region that functions as a regulator of interferon-gamma-induced cell death (5,6). During induction of apoptosis, DAP5 is cleaved at aspartic acid 790. The carboxy-terminal truncated form of DAP5 functions as a cap-independent translation initiation factor responsible for the mediation of its own translation during apoptosis (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The 14-3-3 family of proteins plays a key regulatory role in signal transduction, checkpoint control, apoptotic and nutrient-sensing pathways (1,2). 14-3-3 proteins are highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed. There are at least seven isoforms, β, γ, ε, σ, ζ, τ, and η that have been identified in mammals. The initially described α and δ isoforms are confirmed to be phosphorylated forms of β and ζ, respectively (3). Through their amino-terminal α helical region, 14-3-3 proteins form homo- or heterodimers that interact with a wide variety of proteins: transcription factors, metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, phosphatases, and other signaling molecules (3,4). The interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with their targets is primarily through a phospho-Ser/Thr motif. However, binding to divergent phospho-Ser/Thr motifs, as well as phosphorylation independent interactions has been observed (4). 14-3-3 binding masks specific sequences of the target protein, and therefore, modulates target protein localization, phosphorylation state, stability, and molecular interactions (1-4). 14-3-3 proteins may also induce target protein conformational changes that modify target protein function (4,5). Distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns of 14-3-3 isoforms have been observed in development and in acute response to extracellular signals and drugs, suggesting that 14-3-3 isoforms may perform different functions despite their sequence similarities (4). Several studies suggest that 14-3-3 isoforms are differentially regulated in cancer and neurological syndromes (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RBM15 is an RNA binding protein that is part of the WTAP-METTL3 m6A methyltransferase complex. RBM15 and related RBM15B interact with WTAP to recruit the complex to target mRNAs, and are critical to XIST-mediated gene silencing (1). RBM15 can recruit splicing factors such as SF3B1 to mRNA to promote alternative splicing. Expression levels of RBM15 can be regulated by PRMT1, which can methylate R578, resulting in RBM15 ubiquitinylation and degradation (2). This process is critical in acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, a cancer type where RBM15 is fused to the MKL-1 gene and PRMT1 is overexpressed (3). RBM15 normally plays roles in hematopoietic development and myeloid differentiation, where it can regulate the levels of c-Myc (4-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: LEF1 and TCF are members of the high mobility group (HMG) DNA binding protein family of transcription factors that consists of the following: Lymphoid Enhancer Factor 1 (LEF1), T Cell Factor 1 (TCF1/TCF7), TCF3/TCF7L1, and TCF4/TCF7L2 (1). LEF1 and TCF1/TCF7 were originally identified as important factors regulating early lymphoid development (2) and act downstream in Wnt signaling. LEF1 and TCF bind to Wnt response elements to provide docking sites for β-catenin, which translocates to the nucleus to promote the transcription of target genes upon activation of Wnt signaling (3). LEF1 and TCF are dynamically expressed during development and aberrant activation of the Wnt signaling pathway is involved in many types of cancers including colon cancer (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) comprise a family of transcription factors that function within the Jak/Stat pathway to regulate interferon (IFN) and IFN-inducible gene expression in response to viral infection (1). IRFs play an important role in pathogen defense, autoimmunity, lymphocyte development, cell growth, and susceptibility to transformation. The IRF family includes nine members: IRF-1, IRF-2, IRF-9/ISGF3γ, IRF-3, IRF-4 (Pip/LSIRF/ICSAT), IRF-5, IRF-6, IRF-7, and IRF-8/ICSBP. All IRF proteins share homology in their amino-terminal DNA-binding domains. IRF family members regulate transcription through interactions with proteins that share similar DNA-binding motifs, such as IFN-stimulated response elements (ISRE), IFN consensus sequences (ICS), and IFN regulatory elements (IRF-E) (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: GCNF (Germ Cell Nuclear Factor), also known as NR6A1 (Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 6 Group A member), is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor gene superfamily (1). It has been shown to be expressed in the nervous system during development and during specific stages in maturing germ cells of the ovary and testis in the adult, and has probable roles in gametogenesis, neurogenesis, and normal embryonic development during gastrulation (1,2). Inactivation of GCNF in mouse results in abnormal posterior development, impaired midbrain development, insufficient closure of the neural tube, and eventual embryonic death (3). GCNF has been shown to be a repressor of OCT-4 and of the protamine genes (4,5) and plays a critical role in the control of gene expression during embryogenesis and spermatogenesis (2,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RMP (RPB5-Mediating Protein), also known as URI (Unconventional prefoldin RBP5 Interactor), was described as an unconventional member of the prefoldin (PFD) family of chaperones that are involved in actin and tubulin folding (1-4). Like conventional members of the α-class of PFDs, RMP contains N- and C-terminal α-helical coiled-coil structures connected by two β hairpins. In addition, RMP possesses an RPB5-binding segment and a long C-terminal acidic segment. It is posited that RMP exists as a component of a macromolecular complex within human cells and functions as a molecular scaffold to assemble a PFD complex containing other PFDs and proteins with functions in transcription and ubiquitination. Indeed, evidence is provided that RMP negatively modulates RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription by binding to TFIIF (5) and RBP5 (6) and is involved in mTOR signaling by coordinating the regulation of nutrient availability with gene expression (1). In accord with its ability to coordinate gene expression with nutrient availability, RMP was shown to be a mitochondrial substrate of S6K1. S6K1-mediated phosphorylation of RMP at Ser371 triggers a series of biochemical events that constitute a negative feedback loop, in part, aimed at restraining S6K1 survival signaling and ensuring that the mitochondrial threshold for apoptosis corresponds to availability of nutrients and growth factors (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: HSPA8, alternately known as HSC70 or HSP73, is a constitutively expressed member of the HSP70 superfamily (1). Although its primary role in cells appears to be that of a general chaperone for unfolded proteins, HSPA8 has also been identified as the uncoating ATPase responsible for removing clathrin from coated vesicles and may also play a role in stabilizing untranslated mRNAs (1-5). In addition to these "housekeeping" functions, HSPA8 may also have an important role in inducible cellular stress responses. For example, oxidative or thermal stress promotes the nuclear/nucleolar accumulation of HSPA8, where it forms a complex with the topoisomerase I complex and likely protects it from heat inactivation (6,7). HSPA8 is reportedly phosphorylated in response to DNA damage, but it remains unclear what effect, if any, this has on HSPA8 function (8-10). Numerous high throughput studies support this observation. For more information, please see the HSPA8 page in PhosphoSitePlus® at www.phosphosite.org.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: NFI-C belongs to the nuclear factor I (NFI) family of site-specific transcription factors that regulate viral DNA replication and expression of various genes (1,2). The NFI family is composed of four members in vertebrates: NFI-A, NFI-B, NFI-C, and NFI-X, all of which are critical in the development of multiple organ systems in mice and humans (3). NFI-C is expressed in various tissues and regulates TGF-β dependent tooth development and hair follicle cycling (3-5). Research studies have shown that NFI-C directly represses FoxF1 transcription and suppresses the motility and invasiveness of breast cancer cells (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Paired box (PAX) proteins are a family of transcription factors that play important and diverse roles in animal development (1). Nine PAX proteins (PAX1-9) have been described in humans and other mammals. They are defined by the presence of an amino-terminal "paired" domain, consisting of two helix-turn-helix motifs, with DNA binding activity (2). PAX proteins are classified into four structurally distinct subgroups (I-IV) based on the absence or presence of a carboxy-terminal homeodomain and a central octapeptide region. Subgroup I (PAX1 and 9) contains the octapeptide but lacks the homeodomain; subgroup II (PAX2, 5, and 8) contains the octapeptide and a truncated homeodomain; subgroup III (PAX3 and 7) contains the octapeptide and a complete homeodomain; and subgroup IV (PAX4 and 6) contains a complete homeodomain but lacks the octapeptide region (2). PAX proteins play critically important roles in development by regulating transcriptional networks responsible for embryonic patterning and organogenesis (3); a subset of PAX proteins also maintain functional importance during postnatal development (4). Research studies have implicated genetic mutations that result in aberrant expression of PAX genes in a number of cancer subtypes (1-3), with members of subgroups II and III identified as potential mediators of tumor progression (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: E4BP4/NFIL3 is a basic leucine zipper transcriptional regulator that plays a variety of roles in the immune system (1). For example, E4BP4/NFIL3 is required for bone marrow-derived NK cell development (2,3). In addition, it regulates IgE class switching in B cells by controlling IL-4 dependent induction of germ-line ε (GLε) transcription (4). In macrophages, E4BP4/NFIL3 is induced following exposure to bacteria and negatively regulates transcription of IL-12 p40. E4BP4/NFIL3 also controls cytokine production by T cells. Th2 cells from E4BP4/NFIL3(-/-) mice produced elevated levels of IL-5 an IL-13, but reduced levels of IL-4 ad IL-10 (5,6). Chronically stimulated Th1 cells, regulatory T cells, and NKT cells from E4BP4/NFIL3(-/-) mice all produce reduced levels of IL-10 and IL-13 (6). Finally, E4BP4/NFIL3 is also required for the development of conventional CD8α+ dendritic cells, as this subset is absent from E4BP4/NFIL3(-/-) mice (7).