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Rat Regulation of Cell Cycle

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: TDP43 (TAR DNA-binding protein 43) is involved in transcriptional regulation and exon splicing (1,2). While normal TDP43 is a nuclear protein, pathological TDP43 is a component of insoluble aggregates in patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In these disorders, TDP43 is abnormally ubiquitinated, phosphorylated and cleaved to generate carboxy-terminal fragments that are sequestered as insoluble aggregates in neuronal nuclei, perikarya, and neurites (3,4). Additionally, TDP43 inhibits the expression of the HIV-1 gene and regulates CFTR gene splicing (1,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Three distinct PCTAIRE isoforms (PCTAIRE 1, PCTAIRE 2 and PCTAIRE 3) have been identified in humans and belong to the CDK family of serine/threonine protein kinases. These proteins have a core kinase domain flanked by unique amino- and carboxy-terminal domains. CDK proteins are known to regulate the cell cycle. All three PCTAIRE isoforms are abundantly expressed and catalytically active in post-mitotic brain, suggesting that they may function in processes other than cell division (1). PCTAIRE 1 is a cytoplasmic phosphoprotein whose kinase activity peaks in G2 and S phase (2). While one study indicates that noncovalent interactions with a regulatory component (such as a cyclin) are necessary for catalytic activity of PCTAIRE 1, others show that the monomeric protein is fully active (3). The Cdk5/p25 complex phosphorylates PCTAIRE 1 at Ser95, enhancing its kinase activity (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: High temperature requirement protein A2 (HtrA2)/Omi is a serine protease with homology to the E. coli HtrA protein (DegP) and is thought to be involved in apoptosis and stress-induced degradation of misfolded proteins (1). While HtrA2 was orignally identified to be present in either the nucleus (1) or endoplasmic reticulum (2), subsequent studies have shown that it localizes in mitochondria and is released during apoptosis (3-8). HtrA2 is produced as a 50 kDa zymogen that is cleaved to generate a 36 kDa mature protein that exposes an amino terminal motif (AVPS) resembling that of the IAP inhibitor Smac/Diablo (3-8). Like Smac, interaction between HtrA2 and IAP family members, such as XIAP, antagonizes their inhibition of caspase activity and protection from apoptosis (3-8). Interestingly, HtrA2 knock-out mice did not show signs of reduced apoptosis, but rather had a loss of neurons in the striatum and a Parkinson's-like phenotype, suggesting that HtrA2 might have a neuroprotective function (9-11). This activity is associated with the protease activity of HtrA2 (9). Furthermore, research studies have shown that loss of function mutations in the HtrA2 gene are associated with Parkinson's disease (12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TDP43 (TAR DNA-binding protein 43) is involved in transcriptional regulation and exon splicing (1,2). While normal TDP43 is a nuclear protein, pathological TDP43 is a component of insoluble aggregates in patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In these disorders, TDP43 is abnormally ubiquitinated, phosphorylated and cleaved to generate carboxy-terminal fragments that are sequestered as insoluble aggregates in neuronal nuclei, perikarya, and neurites (3,4). Additionally, TDP43 inhibits the expression of the HIV-1 gene and regulates CFTR gene splicing (1,5).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: TDP43 (TAR DNA-binding protein 43) is involved in transcriptional regulation and exon splicing (1,2). While normal TDP43 is a nuclear protein, pathological TDP43 is a component of insoluble aggregates in patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In these disorders, TDP43 is abnormally ubiquitinated, phosphorylated and cleaved to generate carboxy-terminal fragments that are sequestered as insoluble aggregates in neuronal nuclei, perikarya, and neurites (3,4). Additionally, TDP43 inhibits the expression of the HIV-1 gene and regulates CFTR gene splicing (1,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DOT1-like protein (DOT1L), also known as Lysine N-methyltransferase 4 (KMT4), is a histone methyltransferase that functions to mono-, di-, and tri-methylate histone H3 on lysine 79, a histone modification that is associated with active transcription and plays a role in DNA damage response, cell cycle regulation, and embryonic stem cell development (1). DOT1L is required for the initiation and maintenance of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged leukemias, and selective DOT1L inhibitors such as EP2-5676 show remarkable anti-tumor effects in MLL-rearranged leukemias (2,3). Multiple studies have also implicated DOT1L in solid tumor cancers such as breast cancer, where DOT1L induces neoplastic transformation of immortalized breast cancer cells and promotes tumor initiation and growth. Overexpression of DOT1L is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer, and selective DOT1L inhibitors are able to suppress proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells (4-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: HSPA8, alternately known as HSC70 or HSP73, is a constitutively expressed member of the HSP70 superfamily (1). Although its primary role in cells appears to be that of a general chaperone for unfolded proteins, HSPA8 has also been identified as the uncoating ATPase responsible for removing clathrin from coated vesicles and may also play a role in stabilizing untranslated mRNAs (1-5). In addition to these "housekeeping" functions, HSPA8 may also have an important role in inducible cellular stress responses. For example, oxidative or thermal stress promotes the nuclear/nucleolar accumulation of HSPA8, where it forms a complex with the topoisomerase I complex and likely protects it from heat inactivation (6,7). HSPA8 is reportedly phosphorylated in response to DNA damage, but it remains unclear what effect, if any, this has on HSPA8 function (8-10). Numerous high throughput studies support this observation. For more information, please see the HSPA8 page in PhosphoSitePlus® at www.phosphosite.org.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The COP9 Signalosome (CSN) is a ubiquitously expressed multiprotein complex that is involved in a vast array of cellular and developmental processes, which is thought to be attributed to its control over the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Typically, the CSN is composed of eight highly conserved subunits (CSN1-CSN8), each of which is homologous to one of the eight subunits that form the lid of the 26S proteasome particle, suggesting that these complexes have a common evolutionary ancestor (1). CSN was first identified in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with a light-grown seedling phenotype when grown in the dark (2-4). The subsequent cloning of the constitutive morphogenesis 9 (cop9) mutant from Arabidopsis thaliana was soon followed by the biochemical purification of the COP9-containing multiprotein complex (4). It is now widely accepted that the CSN directly interacts with cullin-RING ligase (CRL) families of ubiquitin E3 complexes, and that CSN is required for their proper function (5). In addition, CSN may also regulate protein homeostasis through its association with protein kinases and deubiquitinating enzymes. Collectively, these activities position the CSN as a pivotal regulator of the DNA-damage response, cell-cycle control, and gene expression (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2 kinase. The critical regulatory step in activating cdc2 during progression into mitosis appears to be dephosphorylation of Tyr15 and Thr14 (1,2). Phosphorylation at Tyr15 and Thr14 and inhibition of cdc2 is carried out by Wee1 and Myt1 protein kinases, while Tyr15 dephosphorylation and activation of cdc2 is carried out by the cdc25 phosphatase (1,3,4). Hyperphosphorylation and inactivation of Myt1 in mitosis suggests that one or more kinases activated at the G2/M transition negatively regulates Myt1 activity. Kinases shown to phosphorylate Myt1 include cdc2, p90RSK, Akt, and Plk1 (5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Members of the F-box family of proteins are characterized by the approximate 40 amino acid F-box motif named after cyclin F (1,2). F-box proteins constitute one of the four subunits of the Skp1-Cullin-F-box (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complex. The substrate specificity of SCF complexes is determined by the interchangeable F-box proteins, which act as adaptors by associating with phosphorylated substrate proteins and recruiting them to the SCF core. F-box proteins contain two fundamental domains: the F-box motif mediates binding to Skp1 and a leucine rich repeat (LRR) domain mediates substrate interactions.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The COP9 Signalosome (CSN) is a ubiquitously expressed multiprotein complex that is involved in a vast array of cellular and developmental processes, which is thought to be attributed to its control over the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Typically, the CSN is composed of eight highly conserved subunits (CSN1-CSN8), each of which is homologous to one of the eight subunits that form the lid of the 26S proteasome particle, suggesting that these complexes have a common evolutionary ancestor (1). CSN was first identified in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with a light-grown seedling phenotype when grown in the dark (2-4). The subsequent cloning of the constitutive morphogenesis 9 (cop9) mutant from Arabidopsis thaliana was soon followed by the biochemical purification of the COP9-containing multiprotein complex (4). It is now widely accepted that the CSN directly interacts with cullin-RING ligase (CRL) families of ubiquitin E3 complexes, and that CSN is required for their proper function (5). In addition, CSN may also regulate protein homeostasis through its association with protein kinases and deubiquitinating enzymes. Collectively, these activities position the CSN as a pivotal regulator of the DNA-damage response, cell-cycle control, and gene expression (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: High temperature requirement protein A2 (HtrA2)/Omi is a serine protease with homology to the E. coli HtrA protein (DegP) and is thought to be involved in apoptosis and stress-induced degradation of misfolded proteins (1). While HtrA2 was orignally identified to be present in either the nucleus (1) or endoplasmic reticulum (2), subsequent studies have shown that it localizes in mitochondria and is released during apoptosis (3-8). HtrA2 is produced as a 50 kDa zymogen that is cleaved to generate a 36 kDa mature protein that exposes an amino terminal motif (AVPS) resembling that of the IAP inhibitor Smac/Diablo (3-8). Like Smac, interaction between HtrA2 and IAP family members, such as XIAP, antagonizes their inhibition of caspase activity and protection from apoptosis (3-8). Interestingly, HtrA2 knock-out mice did not show signs of reduced apoptosis, but rather had a loss of neurons in the striatum and a Parkinson's-like phenotype, suggesting that HtrA2 might have a neuroprotective function (9-11). This activity is associated with the protease activity of HtrA2 (9). Furthermore, research studies have shown that loss of function mutations in the HtrA2 gene are associated with Parkinson's disease (12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: BRCA1-Associated Protein 1 (BAP1) was originally identified as a BRCA1 associated, nuclear localized ubiquitin hydrolase that suppresses cell growth (1). The protein belongs to the UCH family of deubiquitinases, with a UCH domain in its amino-terminal segment and a BRCA1 interaction domain as well as a nuclear localization signal in its carboxy-terminal segment (1). Frequent gene locus rearrangement, deletion, and null mutation of BAP1 have been found in lung and breast cancers (1,2). In vivo mutation analysis of cancer cell line survival and animal tumorigenesis indicates that both the deubiquitinase activity and the nuclear localization signal are required for BAP1 function as a tumor suppressor (3). BAP1 does not have direct deubiquitination activity towards the autoubiquitinated BRCA1/BARD1 E3 complex (4), but its interaction with BARD1 inhibits BRCA1/BARD1 E3 activity by interfering with the complex dimerization process (5). In addition to its interaction with BRCA1/BARD1, BAP1 has also been shown to interact with and deubiquitinate HCF-1, thereby controlling its stability (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor family includes the retinoblastoma protein Rb (p105), retinoblastoma-like protein 1 (RBL1, p107), and retinoblastoma-like protein 2 (RBL2, p130). These Rb family proteins are referred to as ‘pocket proteins’ because they contain a conserved binding pocket region that interacts with critical regulatory proteins, including E2F family transcription factors, c-Abl tyrosine kinase, and proteins containing a conserved LXCXE motif (1,2). In quiescent G0 phase cells, active Rb proteins are hypophosphorylated and bind to E2F transcription factors to repress transcription and inhibit cell cycle progression (1,2). Upon growth factor induction of quiescent cells, Rb proteins become hyperphosphorylated and inactivated by G1-phase cyclinD-cdk4/6, G1/S-phase cyclin E-cdk2, and G1/S-phase cyclin A-cdk2 complexes (1,2). Hyperphosphorylation of Rb proteins results in a loss of E2F binding and allows for transcriptional activation and cell cycle progression (1,2). In addition to regulating the cell cycle, Rb proteins regulate chromosome stability, induction, and maintenance of senescence, apoptosis, cellular differentiation, and angiogenesis (3).Retinoblastoma-like protein 2 (RBL2, p130) is the most predominant and active Rb family member found in quiescent cells. In these cells, RBL2 interacts with E2F4 and E2F5 to recruit the DP, RB-like, E2F, and MuvB protein (DREAM) complex to E2F target genes to repress transcription of multiple genes required for progression into S phase and mitosis (4-6). Hypophosphorylation of RBL2 during cellular senescence is required for maintenance of senescent cells (7,8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The mammalian Mediator Complex is a multi-subunit protein complex that couples specific transcriptional regulators to RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and the basal transcription machinery. Interactions between distinct Mediator subunits and transcription factors allow for specific gene regulation (reviewed in 1).Mediator complex interactions control various biological processes, including insulin signaling (2), NF-κB-dependent signaling (3), stem cell pluripotency and self renewal (4,5), and proliferation of colon cancer cells (6,7).CDK8/Cyclin C, along with Med12 and Med13, constitute a subcomplex within the Mediator Complex thought to act as a molecular switch, inhibiting Pol II recruitment and transcription initiation (8,9). Expression of CDK8 abrogates E2F-1-dependent inhibition of β-catenin activity in colon cancer cells (9). High levels of CDK8 coincide with high β-catenin-dependent transcription in colon cancer cells, and their proliferation can be inhibited by suppressing CDK8 expression (8).CDK8 can phosphorylate Ser727 on STAT1, which reduces natural killer (NK) cell toxicity (10,11). As such, inhibitors are being pursued as potential therapeutics to enhance NK cell activity and combat a variety of cancer types (12,13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mitotic control is important for normal growth, development, and maintenance of all eukaryotic cells. Research studies have demonstrated that inappropriate control of mitosis can lead to genomic instability and cancer (reviewed in 1,2). A regulator of mitosis, Greatwall kinase (Gwl), was first identified in Drosophila melanogaster (3). Subsequent studies showed that, based on sequence homology and function, microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinase-like (MASTL) is the human ortholog of Gwl (4). Regulation of MASTL/Gwl activation has been shown to be critical for the correct timing of mitosis. Research studies have shown that Gwl is activated by hyperphosphorylation (5). The phosphorylation of human Gwl at Thr194 and Thr207 by active cyclin B1-cdc2 leads to possible autophosphorylation at Ser875 (Ser883 in Xenopus), which stabilizes the kinase. Activated Gwl phosphorylates α-Endosulfine (ENSA) and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 19 (ARPP19) at Ser67 and Ser62, respectively. Phosphorylated ENSA and ARPP19 inhibit the activity of the B55 subunit-associated form of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-B55), allowing for complete phosphorylation of mitotic substrates by cyclin B1-cdc2 and mitotic entry. When Gwl is inactivated, PP2A-B55 reactivates, which leads to dephosphorylation of cyclin B1-cdc2 and mitotic exit (5,6, reviewed in 7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rho family small GTPases, including Rho, Rac and cdc42, act as molecular switches, regulating processes such as cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. They are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which catalyze the exchange of bound GDP for GTP, and inhibited by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), which catalyze the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP. A third level of regulation is provided by the stoichiometric binding of Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (RhoGDI) (1). RhoA, RhoB and RhoC are highly homologous, but appear to have divergent biological functions. Carboxy-terminal modifications and differences in subcellular localization allow these three proteins to respond to and act on distinct signaling molecules (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tuberin is a product of the TSC2 tumor suppressor gene and an important regulator of cell proliferation and tumor development (1). Mutations in either TSC2 or the related TSC1 (hamartin) gene cause tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by development of multiple, widespread non-malignant tumors (2). Tuberin is directly phosphorylated at Thr1462 by Akt/PKB (3). Phosphorylation at Thr1462 and Tyr1571 regulates tuberin-hamartin complexes and tuberin activity (3-5). In addition, tuberin inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which promotes inhibition of p70 S6 kinase, activation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1, an inhibitor of translation initiation), and eventual inhibition of translation (3,6,7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tuberin is a product of the TSC2 tumor suppressor gene and an important regulator of cell proliferation and tumor development (1). Mutations in either TSC2 or the related TSC1 (hamartin) gene cause tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by development of multiple, widespread non-malignant tumors (2). Tuberin is directly phosphorylated at Thr1462 by Akt/PKB (3). Phosphorylation at Thr1462 and Tyr1571 regulates tuberin-hamartin complexes and tuberin activity (3-5). In addition, tuberin inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which promotes inhibition of p70 S6 kinase, activation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1, an inhibitor of translation initiation), and eventual inhibition of translation (3,6,7).