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Rat Rho Protein Signal Transduction

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Rho family small GTPases, including Rho, Rac and cdc42, act as molecular switches, regulating processes such as cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. They are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which catalyze the exchange of bound GDP for GTP, and inhibited by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), which catalyze the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP. A third level of regulation is provided by the stoichiometric binding of Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (RhoGDI). RhoGDI affects Rho activity by inhibiting nucleotide exchange and membrane association, regulating activity and localization (Reviewed in 1, 2). The inhibitory and shuttling functions of RhoGDI have been uncoupled using mutant forms of RhoGDI (3). Phosphorylation of GDIs and/or GTPases can modulate their affinity for each other and, therefore, GTPase mediated signaling. PAK1 phosphorylation of RhoGDI at serines 101 and 174 causes release and activation of Rac1, but not RhoA (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rho family small GTPases regulate processes such as cell migration, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. They are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which catalyze the exchange of GDP for GTP. GEF-H1 is a Rho GEF that localizes to microtubules and regulates Rho activity in response to microtubule destabilization (1). Loss of interaction between GEF-H1 and microtubules leads to activation of Rho (2). Phosphorylation of GEF-H1 at Ser886 (Ser885 in mouse), a site located in the 14-3-3 binding motif, has been implicated in recruitment of 14-3-3 and GEF-H1 to microtubules (3), and in the regulation of RhoA activity in response to mitotic kinases during cytokinesis (4).GEF-H1 has also been shown to localize to tight junctions and modulate polarized cell permeability (5,6). GEF-H1 is inactivated by binding to cingulin at epithelial tight junctions, inactivating RhoA and leading to G1/S arrest (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rho family small GTPases regulate processes such as cell migration, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. They are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which catalyze the exchange of GDP for GTP. GEF-H1 is a Rho GEF that localizes to microtubules and regulates Rho activity in response to microtubule destabilization (1). Loss of interaction between GEF-H1 and microtubules leads to activation of Rho (2). Phosphorylation of GEF-H1 at Ser886 (Ser885 in mouse), a site located in the 14-3-3 binding motif, has been implicated in recruitment of 14-3-3 and GEF-H1 to microtubules (3), and in the regulation of RhoA activity in response to mitotic kinases during cytokinesis (4).GEF-H1 has also been shown to localize to tight junctions and modulate polarized cell permeability (5,6). GEF-H1 is inactivated by binding to cingulin at epithelial tight junctions, inactivating RhoA and leading to G1/S arrest (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rho family small GTPases, including Rho, Rac and cdc42, act as molecular switches, regulating processes such as cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. They are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which catalyze the exchange of bound GDP for GTP, and inhibited by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), which catalyze the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP. A third level of regulation is provided by the stoichiometric binding of Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (RhoGDI) (1). RhoA, RhoB and RhoC are highly homologous, but appear to have divergent biological functions. Carboxy-terminal modifications and differences in subcellular localization allow these three proteins to respond to and act on distinct signaling molecules (2,3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Rac and Cdc42 are members of the Rho-GTPase family. In mammals, Rac exists as three isoforms, Rac1, Rac2 and Rac3, which are highly similar in sequence. Rac1 and Cdc42, the most widely studied of this group, are ubiquitously expressed. Rac2 is expressed in cells of hematopoietic origin, and Rac3, while highly expressed in brain, is also found in many other tissues. Rac and Cdc42 play key signaling roles in cytoskeletal reorganization, membrane trafficking, transcriptional regulation, cell growth and development (1). GTP binding stimulates the activity of Rac/Cdc42, and the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP through the protein's intrinsic GTPase activity, rendering it inactive. GTP hydrolysis is aided by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), while exchange of GDP for GTP is facilitated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Another level of regulation is achieved through the binding of RhoGDI, a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor, which retains Rho family GTPases, including Rac and Cdc42, in their inactive GDP-bound state (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rho family GTPases are key regulators of diverse processes such as cytoskeletal organization, cell growth and differentiation, transcriptional regulation, and cell adhesion/motility. The activities of these proteins are controlled primarily through guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that facilitate the exchange of GDP for GTP, promoting the active (GTP-bound) state, and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) that promote GTP hydrolysis and the inactive (GDP-bound) state (1,2).The p190 RhoGAP proteins are widely expressed Rho family GAPs. p190-A has been characterized as a tumor suppressor, and research studies have shown that loss or rearrangement of the chromosomal region containing the gene for p190-A is linked to tumor development (3,4). p190-A binds the mitogen-inducible transcription factor TFII-I, sequestering it in the cytoplasm and inhibiting its activity. Phosphorylation of p190-A at Tyr308 reduces its affinity for TFII-I, relieving the inhibition (5). p190-A can also inhibit growth factor-induced gliomas in mice (6) and affect cleavage furrow formation and cytokinesis in cultured cells (7).Mice lacking p190-B RhoGAP show excessive Rho activation and a reduction in activation of the transcription factor CREB (8). Cells deficient in p190-B display defective adipogenesis (9). There is increasing evidence that p190 undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation, which activates its GAP domain (9-11). Levels of tyrosine phosphorylation are enhanced by Src overexpression (10,11). IGF-I treatment downregulates Rho through phosphorylation and activation of p190-B RhoGAP, thereby enhancing IGF signaling implicated in adipogenesis (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Rho family GTPases are key regulators of diverse processes such as cytoskeletal organization, cell growth and differentiation, transcriptional regulation, and cell adhesion/motility. The activities of these proteins are controlled primarily through guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that facilitate the exchange of GDP for GTP, promoting the active (GTP-bound) state, and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) that promote GTP hydrolysis and the inactive (GDP-bound) state (1,2).The p190 RhoGAP proteins are widely expressed Rho family GAPs. p190-A has been characterized as a tumor suppressor, and research studies have shown that loss or rearrangement of the chromosomal region containing the gene for p190-A is linked to tumor development (3,4). p190-A binds the mitogen-inducible transcription factor TFII-I, sequestering it in the cytoplasm and inhibiting its activity. Phosphorylation of p190-A at Tyr308 reduces its affinity for TFII-I, relieving the inhibition (5). p190-A can also inhibit growth factor-induced gliomas in mice (6) and affect cleavage furrow formation and cytokinesis in cultured cells (7).Mice lacking p190-B RhoGAP show excessive Rho activation and a reduction in activation of the transcription factor CREB (8). Cells deficient in p190-B display defective adipogenesis (9). There is increasing evidence that p190 undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation, which activates its GAP domain (9-11). Levels of tyrosine phosphorylation are enhanced by Src overexpression (10,11). IGF-I treatment downregulates Rho through phosphorylation and activation of p190-B RhoGAP, thereby enhancing IGF signaling implicated in adipogenesis (9).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Rho family small GTPases, including Rho, Rac and cdc42, act as molecular switches, regulating processes such as cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. They are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which catalyze the exchange of bound GDP for GTP, and inhibited by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), which catalyze the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP. A third level of regulation is provided by the stoichiometric binding of Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (RhoGDI) (1).G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the cell surface signal through heteromeric G proteins to small GTPases such as Rho, which then signal to downstream effector molecules (2). p115 RhoGEF/ArhGEF1 and its family members PDZ-RhoGEF (PRG), and LARG are stimulated by heteromeric G proteins and thus couple signaling from GPCRs to Rho small GTPases (3-6). In a mouse model of asthma, p115 RhoGEF is necessary for T cells to enable airway inflammation and hyperreactivity (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ROCK (Rho-associated kinase), a family of serine/threonine kinases, is an important downstream target of Rho-GTPase and plays an important role in Rho-mediated signaling. Two isoforms of ROCK have been identified: ROCK1 and ROCK2. ROCK is composed of N-terminal catalytic, coiled-coil, and C-terminal PH (pleckstrin homology) domains. The C-terminus of ROCK negatively regulates its kinase activity (1,2). Caspase-3-induced cleavage of ROCK1 and direct cleavage of ROCK2 by granzyme B (grB) activates ROCK and leads to phosphorylation of myosin light chain and inhibition of myosin phosphatase (3). This phosphorylation may account for the mechanism by which Rho regulates cytokinesis, cell motility, cell membrane blebbing during apoptosis, and smooth muscle contraction (4-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ROCK (Rho-associated kinase), a family of serine/threonine kinases, is an important downstream target of Rho-GTPase and plays an important role in Rho-mediated signaling. Two isoforms of ROCK have been identified: ROCK1 and ROCK2. ROCK is composed of N-terminal catalytic, coiled-coil, and C-terminal PH (pleckstrin homology) domains. The C-terminus of ROCK negatively regulates its kinase activity (1,2). Caspase-3-induced cleavage of ROCK1 and direct cleavage of ROCK2 by granzyme B (grB) activates ROCK and leads to phosphorylation of myosin light chain and inhibition of myosin phosphatase (3). This phosphorylation may account for the mechanism by which Rho regulates cytokinesis, cell motility, cell membrane blebbing during apoptosis, and smooth muscle contraction (4-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Rho family small GTPases, including Rho, Rac and cdc42, act as molecular switches, regulating processes such as cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. They are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which catalyze the exchange of bound GDP for GTP, and inhibited by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), which catalyze the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP. A third level of regulation is provided by the stoichiometric binding of Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (RhoGDI) (1). RhoA, RhoB and RhoC are highly homologous, but appear to have divergent biological functions. Carboxy-terminal modifications and differences in subcellular localization allow these three proteins to respond to and act on distinct signaling molecules (2,3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rho family small GTPases, including Rho, Rac and cdc42, act as molecular switches, regulating processes such as cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. They are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which catalyze the exchange of bound GDP for GTP, and inhibited by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), which catalyze the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP. A third level of regulation is provided by the stoichiometric binding of Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (RhoGDI) (1). RhoA, RhoB and RhoC are highly homologous, but appear to have divergent biological functions. Carboxy-terminal modifications and differences in subcellular localization allow these three proteins to respond to and act on distinct signaling molecules (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Rho family GTPases are key regulators of diverse processes such as cytoskeletal organization, cell growth and differentiation, transcriptional regulation, and cell adhesion/motility. The activities of these proteins are controlled primarily through guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that facilitate the exchange of GDP for GTP, promoting the active (GTP-bound) state, and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) that promote GTP hydrolysis and the inactive (GDP-bound) state (1,2).The p190 RhoGAP proteins are widely expressed Rho family GAPs. p190-A has been characterized as a tumor suppressor, and research studies have shown that loss or rearrangement of the chromosomal region containing the gene for p190-A is linked to tumor development (3,4). p190-A binds the mitogen-inducible transcription factor TFII-I, sequestering it in the cytoplasm and inhibiting its activity. Phosphorylation of p190-A at Tyr308 reduces its affinity for TFII-I, relieving the inhibition (5). p190-A can also inhibit growth factor-induced gliomas in mice (6) and affect cleavage furrow formation and cytokinesis in cultured cells (7).Mice lacking p190-B RhoGAP show excessive Rho activation and a reduction in activation of the transcription factor CREB (8). Cells deficient in p190-B display defective adipogenesis (9). There is increasing evidence that p190 undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation, which activates its GAP domain (9-11). Levels of tyrosine phosphorylation are enhanced by Src overexpression (10,11). IGF-I treatment downregulates Rho through phosphorylation and activation of p190-B RhoGAP, thereby enhancing IGF signaling implicated in adipogenesis (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rho family GTPases are key regulators of diverse processes such as cytoskeletal organization, cell growth and differentiation, transcriptional regulation, and cell adhesion/motility. The activities of these proteins are controlled primarily through guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that facilitate the exchange of GDP for GTP, promoting the active (GTP-bound) state, and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) that promote GTP hydrolysis and the inactive (GDP-bound) state (1,2).The p190 RhoGAP proteins are widely expressed Rho family GAPs. p190-A has been characterized as a tumor suppressor, and research studies have shown that loss or rearrangement of the chromosomal region containing the gene for p190-A is linked to tumor development (3,4). p190-A binds the mitogen-inducible transcription factor TFII-I, sequestering it in the cytoplasm and inhibiting its activity. Phosphorylation of p190-A at Tyr308 reduces its affinity for TFII-I, relieving the inhibition (5). p190-A can also inhibit growth factor-induced gliomas in mice (6) and affect cleavage furrow formation and cytokinesis in cultured cells (7).Mice lacking p190-B RhoGAP show excessive Rho activation and a reduction in activation of the transcription factor CREB (8). Cells deficient in p190-B display defective adipogenesis (9). There is increasing evidence that p190 undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation, which activates its GAP domain (9-11). Levels of tyrosine phosphorylation are enhanced by Src overexpression (10,11). IGF-I treatment downregulates Rho through phosphorylation and activation of p190-B RhoGAP, thereby enhancing IGF signaling implicated in adipogenesis (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ROCK (Rho-associated kinase), a family of serine/threonine kinases, is an important downstream target of Rho-GTPase and plays an important role in Rho-mediated signaling. Two isoforms of ROCK have been identified: ROCK1 and ROCK2. ROCK is composed of N-terminal catalytic, coiled-coil, and C-terminal PH (pleckstrin homology) domains. The C-terminus of ROCK negatively regulates its kinase activity (1,2). Caspase-3-induced cleavage of ROCK1 and direct cleavage of ROCK2 by granzyme B (grB) activates ROCK and leads to phosphorylation of myosin light chain and inhibition of myosin phosphatase (3). This phosphorylation may account for the mechanism by which Rho regulates cytokinesis, cell motility, cell membrane blebbing during apoptosis, and smooth muscle contraction (4-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The MCF2/Dbl proto-oncogene product is the founding member of the Dbl family of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that are characterized by their Dbl homology (DH) domain (1). GEFs stimulate the formation of the active, GTP-bound form of small GTPases such as Rho, Rac and Cdc42, signaling to various downstream molecules and regulating diverse cell functions. While the overexpressed, full-length Dbl gene has transforming activity (2), mutations resulting in truncated Dbl cause the protein to become highly oncogenic. This truncated form of Dbl, which lacks the amino-terminal 497 amino acids, has constitutive GEF activity (3) and is more stable than the full-length variant (4), allowing for increased signaling to downstream effector molecules.Dbl interacts with ezrin, a member of the ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) family of proteins that links the plasma membrane to the actin cytoskeleton. Dbl interacts with ezrin in lipid microdomains, which leads to Cdc42 activation and the regulation of processes such as filopodia formation and cell polarity (5,6). Dbl localization and biological activities are regulated in part by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) (7). Dbl is also involved in cell survival and inhibits apoptosis through induction of Akt phosphorylation at Thr308 (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cool/Pix proteins comprise a family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) localized to focal adhesions. The family consists of two isoforms, cool2/αpix and cool1/βPix, the latter having two splice variants that vary in their carboxy termini (1). Cool1/βPix, like other GEFs, has a DH (Dbl homology) domain, which allows binding of small GTPases and GDP/GTP exchange, and a PH (Pleckstrin homology) domain, which is important in regulating subcellular localization. Cool1/βPix also has an SH3 domain, which binds to the PAK kinase, a downstream effector of cdc42 and Rac (3,4). Phosphorylation of cool1/βPix by PAK2 downstream of MAPK signaling alters the localization of a complex containing PAK2 and cool-1/βPix, regulating formation of growth cones in response to growth factors (4). Growth factor induced activation of Rac1 via cool1/βPix was later shown to occur independently of subcellular localization (5). Endothelin-1 stimulation of mesangial cells stimulates the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, resulting in translocation of cool-1/βPix and activation of cdc42 (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Bcr gene was orginally identified by its presence in the chimeric Bcr-Abl oncogene (1). The amino-terminal region of Bcr contains an oligomerization domain, a serine/threonine kinase domain, and a region that binds SH2 domains. The middle of the protein has a PH domain and a region of sequence similarity to the guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the Rho family of GTP binding proteins. The carboxy-terminal region may be involved in a GTPase activating function for the small GTP-binding protein Rac (2,3). The function of wild type Bcr in cells remains unclear. PDGF receptor may use Bcr as a downstream signaling mediator (4). Research studies have shown that the Bcr-Abl fusion results in production of a constitutively active tyrosine kinase, which causes chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) (5). Tyr177 of Bcr is phosphorylated in the Bcr-Abl fusion protein, which plays an important role in transforming the activity of Bcr-Abl (6). Phosphorylated Tyr177 provides a docking site for Gab2 and GRB2 (7,8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rac and Cdc42 are members of the Rho-GTPase family. In mammals, Rac exists as three isoforms, Rac1, Rac2 and Rac3, which are highly similar in sequence. Rac1 and Cdc42, the most widely studied of this group, are ubiquitously expressed. Rac2 is expressed in cells of hematopoietic origin, and Rac3, while highly expressed in brain, is also found in many other tissues. Rac and Cdc42 play key signaling roles in cytoskeletal reorganization, membrane trafficking, transcriptional regulation, cell growth and development (1). GTP binding stimulates the activity of Rac/Cdc42, and the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP through the protein's intrinsic GTPase activity, rendering it inactive. GTP hydrolysis is aided by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), while exchange of GDP for GTP is facilitated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Another level of regulation is achieved through the binding of RhoGDI, a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor, which retains Rho family GTPases, including Rac and Cdc42, in their inactive GDP-bound state (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Son of sevenless (SOS) was first identified in Drosophila as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Ras acting downstream of the Sevenless receptor (1). Two closely related homologs of Drosophila SOS are found in mammalian cells: SOS1 and SOS2 (2). SOS1 consists of histone folds, Dbl (DH) and pleckstrin (PH) homology domains, a Ras exchange motif (REM), and Cdc25 homology and polyproline domains (3). SOS1 binds to GRB2, NCK, and other adaptor proteins, and plays an important role in ERK activation downstream of protein tyrosine kinase receptor (RTK). Research studies have identified mutations in the corresponding SOS1 gene of patients with Noonan syndrome, a developmental disorder characterized by short stature, facial dysmorphia, and congenital heart defects (4,5).