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Rat Transmembrane Transport

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Glutamatergic neurons release glutamate, the most common excitatory neurotransmitter. Their synaptic vesicles are filled with glutamate by vesicular glutamate transporters, VGLUTs (1). VGLUT1, also called solute carrier family 17 member 7 (SLC17A7), was first identified as an inorganic phosphate transporter (2). Despite the absence of homology with neurotransmitter transporters, VGLUT1 was later demonstrated to be a glutamate transporter (1) specific to glutamatergic neurons (3). Closely related to VGLUT1, VGLUT2 and VGLUT3 are also involved in glutamate uptake into synaptic vesicles, but define different neuronal subpopulations (4,5). VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are the most abundant isoforms. VGLUT1 is expressed in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex, while VGLUT2 is mostly found in the thalamus (6,7). VGLUT3 is expressed in hair cells of the auditory system (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Anion exchange protein 1 (AE1), also named solute carrier family 4 member 1 (SLC4A1), is an anion transporter that mediates chloride-bicarbonate exchange in the kidney and regulates normal acidification of the urine (1,2). A different isoform of AE1 is a major integral membrane structure protein of erythrocytes, where it plays a critical role in the removal of carbon dioxide from tissues (3). In addition, AE1 is required for normal flexibility and stability of the erythrocyte membrane. Mutations in SLC4A1 can lead to hereditary spherocytosis, ovalocytosis, and distal renal tubular-acidosis (4-7). Other mutations that do not cause disease became novel blood group antigens, which are part of the Diego blood group system (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Anion exchange protein 1 (AE1), also named solute carrier family 4 member 1 (SLC4A1), is an anion transporter that mediates chloride-bicarbonate exchange in the kidney and regulates normal acidification of the urine (1,2). A different isoform of AE1 is a major integral membrane structure protein of erythrocytes, where it plays a critical role in the removal of carbon dioxide from tissues (3). In addition, AE1 is required for normal flexibility and stability of the erythrocyte membrane. Mutations in SLC4A1 can lead to hereditary spherocytosis, ovalocytosis, and distal renal tubular-acidosis (4-7). Other mutations that do not cause disease became novel blood group antigens, which are part of the Diego blood group system (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitin is a conserved polypeptide unit that plays an important role in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Ubiquitin can be covalently linked to many cellular proteins by the ubiquitination process, which targets proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Three components are involved in the target protein-ubiquitin conjugation process. Ubiquitin is first activated by forming a thiolester complex with the activation component E1; the activated ubiquitin is subsequently transferred to the ubiquitin-carrier protein E2, then from E2 to ubiquitin ligase E3 for final delivery to the epsilon-NH2 of the target protein lysine residue (1-3). The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has been implicated in a wide range of normal biological processes and in disease-related abnormalities. Several proteins such as IκB, p53, cdc25A, and Bcl-2 have been shown to be targets for the ubiquitin-proteasome process as part of regulation of cell cycle progression, differentiation, cell stress response, and apoptosis (4-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: A group of related glucose transporters (Glut1-5 and 7) mediate the facilitated diffusion of glucose in nonepithelial mammalian tissues. Within insulin-responsive tissues such as muscle and fat, Glut1 contributes to basal glucose uptake while Glut4 is responsible for insulin-stimulated glucose transport (1-3). Glut4 is a 12-transmembrane domain protein that facilitates glucose transport in the direction of the glucose gradient. This transporter localizes to intracellular organelles (endosomes) in unstimulated cells and translocates to the cell surface following insulin stimulation (1,2,4). Translocation of Glut4 is dependent on Akt, which may act by phosphorylating AS160, a RabGAP protein involved in membrane trafficking (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter type 2 (ASCT2 or SLC1A5) is a neutral amino acid transporter that regulates the uptake of essential amino acids in conjunction with the SLC7A5 bilateral transporter (1,2). ASCT2 appears to be the major glutamine transporter in hepatoma cells and is thought to provide essential amino acids needed for tumor growth (3). Additional evidence suggests that ASCT2 plays a role in activating mTORC1 signaling and is required to suppress autophagy (4,5). Cell surface ASCT2 serves as a receptor for several mammalian interference retroviruses associated with cases of infectious immunodeficiency; variation in a small region of an extracellular loop (ECL2) may be responsible for species-specific differences in receptor function (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. During neurotransmission, glutamate is released from vesicles of the pre-synaptic cell, and glutamate receptors (e.g. NMDA Receptor, AMPA Receptor) bind glutamate for activation at the opposing post-synaptic cell. Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) regulate and maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below excitotoxic levels. In addition, glutamate transporters may limit the duration of synaptic excitation by an electrogenic process in which the transmitter is cotransported with three sodium ions and one proton, followed by countertransport of a potassium ion. Five EAATs (EAAT1-5) are characterized: EAAT2 (GLT-1) is primarily expressed in astrocytes but is also expressed in neurons of the retina and during fetal development (1). Homozygous EAAT2 knockout mice have spontaneous, lethal seizures and an increased predisposition to acute cortical injury (2). PKC phosphorylates Ser113 of EAAT2 and coincides with glutamate transport (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glucose transporter 1 (Glut1, SLC2A1) is a widely expressed transport protein that displays a broad range of substrate specificity in transporting a number of different aldose sugars as well as an oxidized form of vitamin C into cells (1,2). Glut1 is responsible for the basal-level uptake of glucose from the blood through facilitated diffusion (2). Research studies show that Glut1 and the transcription factor HIF-1α mediate the regulation of glycolysis by O-GlcNAcylation in cancer cells (3). Additional studies demonstrate that Glut1 is required for CD4 T cell activation and is critical for the expansion and survival of T effector (Teff) cells (4). Mutations in the corresponding SLC2A1 gene cause GLUT1 deficiency syndromes (GLUT1DS1, GLUT1DS2), a pair of neurologic disorders characterized by delayed development, seizures, spasticity, paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia, and acquired microcephaly (5,6). Two other neurologic disorders - dystonia-9 (DYT9) and susceptibility to idiopathic generalized epilepsy 12 (EIG12) - are also caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The high affinity copper uptake protein 1 (CTR1, SLC31A1) helps maintain copper homeostasis by mediating dietary copper intake chiefly in the small intestine (1). A series of methionine-rich repeats and other residues are conserved among CTR1 genes across taxa, and are thought to be important for copper transport (2,3). In mammalian cells, CTR1 is localized to the plasma membrane and intracellular vesicles (3). Upon copper uptake via plasma membrane into cells, CTR1 is down regulated by clathrin-dependent endocytosis and degradation of CTR1 protein (4). Research studies suggest that the CTR1 copper transporter also mediates uptake of the anticancer drug cisplatin in yeast and mammals and that decreased CTR1 can result in the development of cisplatin resistance (5,6). Treatment of cancer cells with cisplatin can result in reduced CTR1 expression, which reduces cisplatin accumulation within cells and leads to cisplatin resistance in some human cancer cells (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: During neurotransmission, glutamate is released from vesicles of the presynaptic cell, and glutamate receptors (e.g., NMDA Receptor, AMPA Receptor) bind glutamate for activation at the opposing postsynaptic cell. Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) regulate and maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below excitotoxic levels (1,2). In addition, glutamate transporters may limit the duration of synaptic excitation by an electrogenic process in which the transmitter is cotransported with three sodium ions and one proton, followed by countertransport of a potassium ion (1,2). Five EAATs (EAAT1-5) have been identified. EAAT1 and EAAT2 are expressed mainly in glia, while EAAT3, EAAT4, and EAAT5 are considered to be neuronal transporters (2). EAAT3 is found in the perisynaptic areas and cell bodies of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons (3). Research studies have implicated abnormal EAAT3 expression in the pathophysiology of Schizophrenia (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SNAT1/SLC38A1 belongs to the system A transporters that mediate Na+-dependent transport of short-chain neutral amino acids such as alanine, serine, and glutamine. SNAT1/SLC38A1 mediates the uptake of glutamine in neurons and plays a crucial role in glutamate-glutamine cycle. Steep concentration gradients across the plasma membrane are achieved by coupling of the electrochemical sodium gradient to amino acid transport. This allows a unidirectional mode of transport for SNAT1/SLC38A1. Upregulation of SNAT1/SLC38A1 by neurotrophic factors is key to dendritic growth and branching of cortical neurons. High expression of SNAT1/SLC38A1 is found in cerebral cortex primarily in neurons and to a lesser extent in astrocytes (1-4). Elevated SNAT1/SLC38A1 expression is prominent in human solid tumors including gliomas, hepatocellular carcinomas and human breast cancer (5-8). Research studies show that an aberrant SNAT1/SLC38A1 expression profile correlates with solid tumor recurrence and poor prognosis in patients with cholangiocarcinoma (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: MRP3/ABCC3 belongs to the super family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. It is a member of the MRP subfamily that is expressed in various organs including liver, gallbladder, small intestine, colon, kidney, and adrenal gland (1-3). MRP3 is involved in multi-drug resistance (1). It facilitates the efflux of organic anions including monoanionic bile acid and anti-cancer reagents such as etoposide and paclitaxel from liver and small intestine into blood (4-7). Expression of MRP3 is increased in the cholestatic human and rat liver, suggesting its role in cholehepatic and enterohepatic bile circulation and in protecting liver from toxic bile salts (2,8). MRP3 expression is also upregulated in people with Dubin-Johnson Syndrome (DJS) who lack functional MRP2 in the liver, which implicates the compensatory role of MRP3 in the absence of functional MRP2 (4).Elevated expression of MRP3 has been detected in various cancer types such as hepatocellular carcinomas, primary ovarian cancer, and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (9-11). Overexpression of MRP3 was reported to be a prognostic factor in ALL and adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (11,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. During neurotransmission, glutamate is released from vesicles of the pre-synaptic cell, and glutamate receptors (e.g. NMDA Receptor, AMPA Receptor) bind glutamate for activation at the opposing post-synaptic cell. Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) regulate and maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below excitotoxic levels. In addition, glutamate transporters may limit the duration of synaptic excitation by an electrogenic process in which the transmitter is cotransported with three sodium ions and one proton, followed by countertransport of a potassium ion. Five EAATs (EAAT1-5) are characterized: EAAT2 (GLT-1) is primarily expressed in astrocytes but is also expressed in neurons of the retina and during fetal development (1). Homozygous EAAT2 knockout mice have spontaneous, lethal seizures and an increased predisposition to acute cortical injury (2). PKC phosphorylates Ser113 of EAAT2 and coincides with glutamate transport (3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. During neurotransmission, glutamate is released from vesicles of the pre-synaptic cell, and glutamate receptors (e.g. NMDA Receptor, AMPA Receptor) bind glutamate for activation at the opposing post-synaptic cell. Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) regulate and maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below excitotoxic levels. In addition, glutamate transporters may limit the duration of synaptic excitation by an electrogenic process in which the transmitter is cotransported with three sodium ions and one proton, followed by countertransport of a potassium ion. Five EAATs (EAAT1-5) are characterized: EAAT2 (GLT-1) is primarily expressed in astrocytes but is also expressed in neurons of the retina and during fetal development (1). Homozygous EAAT2 knockout mice have spontaneous, lethal seizures and an increased predisposition to acute cortical injury (2). PKC phosphorylates Ser113 of EAAT2 and coincides with glutamate transport (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. During neurotransmission, glutamate is released from vesicles of the pre-synaptic cell, and glutamate receptors (e.g. NMDA Receptor, AMPA Receptor) bind glutamate for activation at the opposing post-synaptic cell. Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) regulate and maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below excitotoxic levels. In addition, glutamate transporters may limit the duration of synaptic excitation by an electrogenic process in which the transmitter is cotransported with three sodium ions and one proton, followed by countertransport of a potassium ion. Five EAATs (EAAT1-5) are characterized: EAAT2 (GLT-1) is primarily expressed in astrocytes but is also expressed in neurons of the retina and during fetal development (1). Homozygous EAAT2 knockout mice have spontaneous, lethal seizures and an increased predisposition to acute cortical injury (2). PKC phosphorylates Ser113 of EAAT2 and coincides with glutamate transport (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The electroneutral cation-chloride-coupled co-transporter (SLC12) gene family comprises bumetanide-sensitive Na+/K+/Cl- (NKCC), thiazide-sensitive Na+/Cl-, and K+/Cl- (KCC) co-transporters. SLC12A1/NKCC2 and SLC12A2/NKCC1 regulate cell volume and maintain cellular homeostasis in response to osmotic and oxidative stress (1). The broadly expressed NKCC1 is thought to play roles in fluid secretion (i.e. salivary gland function), salt balance (i.e. maintenance of renin and aldosterone levels), and neuronal development and signaling (2-7). During neuronal development, NKCC1 and KCC2 maintain a fine balance between chloride influx (NKCC1) and efflux (KCC2), which regulates γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated neurotransmission (3). Increased NKCC1 expression in immature neurons maintains high intracellular chloride levels that result in inhibitory GABAergic signaling; KCC2 maintains low intracellular chloride levels and excitatory GABAergic responses in mature neurons (4,5,8). Deletion of NKCC1 impairs NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth in PC-12D cells while inhibition of NKCC1 with bumetanide inhibits re-growth of axotomized dorsal root ganglion cells (6,7). Defective chloride homeostasis in neurons is linked to seizure disorders that are ameliorated by butemanide treatment, indicating that abnormal NKCC1 and NKCC2 expression or signaling may play a role in neonatal and adult seizures (9-12). NKCC1 is found as a homodimer or within heterooligomers with other SLC12 family members. This transport protein associates with a number of oxidative- and osmotic-responsive kinases that bind, phosphorylate, and activate NKCC1 co-transporter activity (13-16). In response to decreased intracellular chloride concentrations, Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) phosphorylates NKCC1 to increase co-transporter activity and promote chloride influx (16-19). Oxidative stress response kinase 1 (OSR1) also phosphorylates and activates NKCC1 in response to oxidative stress (14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Aquaporin 2 (AQP2) is a water transport protein that forms water channels in kidney tubules and plays a predominant role in controlling organism water homeostasis (1). Members of the aquaporin family are multiple pass transmembrane proteins that form homotetramers to facilitate the flow of water across the plasma membrane. At least thirteen aquaporins have been indentified to date (AQP0 through AQP12) and together this family of small, hydrophobic proteins plays a role in an array of biological processes that include urine formation, cell motility, fertilization, cell junction formation and regulation of overall water homeostasis (2). AQP2 tetramers form water channels that facilitate water transport and excretion in the kidney (3). This transport protein is localized to the plasma membrane is response to endocrine signaling. Posterior pituitary hormones arginine vasopressin (AVP) and ADH regulate osmotic water cell permeability by triggering phosphorylation and subsequent exocytosis of AQP2 (1,4). Mutations in the corresponding AQP2 gene cause a rare form of diabetes known as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. This autosomal dominant disorder is characterized by abnormal water reabsorption by kidney tubules due, in part, to either nonfunctional or mislocalized AQP2 protein (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA or cAPK) in mammalian cells and controls many cellular mechanisms such as gene transcription, ion transport, and protein phosphorylation (1). Inactive PKA is a heterotetramer composed of a regulatory subunit (R) dimer and a catalytic subunit (C) dimer. In this inactive state, the pseudosubstrate sequences on the R subunits block the active sites on the C subunits. Three C subunit isoforms (C-α, C-β, and C-γ) and two families of regulatory subunits (RI and RII) with distinct cAMP binding properties have been identified. The two R families exist in two isoforms, α and β (RI-α, RI-β, RII-α, and RII-β). Upon binding of cAMP to the R subunits, the autoinhibitory contact is eased and active monomeric C subunits are released. PKA shares substrate specificity with Akt (PKB) and PKC, which are characterized by an arginine at position -3 relative to the phosphorylated serine or threonine residue (2). Substrates that present this consensus sequence and have been shown to be phosphorylated by PKA are Bad (Ser155), CREB (Ser133), and GSK-3 (GSK-3α Ser21 and GSK-3β Ser9) (3-5). In addition, combined knock-down of PKA C-α and -β blocks cAMP-mediated phosphorylation of Raf (Ser43 and Ser259) (6). Autophosphorylation and phosphorylation by PDK-1 are two known mechanisms responsible for phosphorylation of the C subunit at Thr197 (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: ABCG2 (BCRP1/ABCP/MXR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family that functions as ATP-dependent transporters for a wide variety of chemical compounds and are associated with drug-resistance in cancer cells (1-6). ABCG2 is a heavily glycosylated transmembrane protein with six transmembrane spanning regions consistent with it functioning as a half-transporter. The ABC family can exist as either full-length transporters or as half-transporters that form functional transporters through homo- or heterodimerization. High expression of ABCG2 was found in placenta as well as cell lines selected for resistance to a number of chemotherapeutic drugs, including mitoxantrone, doxorubicin, topotecan and flavopiridol. In rodents, the highest expression of ABCG2 was found in kidney (8). ABCG2 expression has also been observed in stem cell populations, particularly in hematopoietic and neuronal stem cells and is downregulated with differentiation (9-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The multidrug resistance-associated protein 6 (MRP6, ABCC6) is a member of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family transporters that move drugs and hydrophobic compounds across cell membranes. The MRP6 protein is expressed mainly in liver and kidney, and in other tissues to a lesser extent (1). Identified MRP6 substrates include the glutathione conjugate of N-ethylmaleimide (NEM-GS) and leukotriene C4 (LTC4), with more tentative MRP6 substrates under investigation (2,3). Research studies show that increased MRP6 expression correlates with induced cholesterol biosynthesis, which suggests that MRP6 may be involved in lipid and cholesterol homeostasis (4). A small isoform of MRP6 is up-regulated in HBV infected hepatocytes and protects the cells from apoptosis mediated by caspase 3 and caspase 8 (5,6). Mutations in the corresponding ABCC6 gene cause pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), an autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by the accumulation of mineralized and fragmented elastic fibers in the skin, eyes, and arteries (7,8). Mutations in ABCC6 also result in generalized arterial calcification of infancy, an ectopic calcification disease that lies along a spectrum of similar disorders with PXE (9).