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siRNA Calcium-Dependent Protein Binding

Also showing siRNA Transfection Calcium-Dependent Protein Binding

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® S100A4 siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit S100A4 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Despite their relatively small size (8-12 kDa) and uncomplicated architecture, S100 proteins regulate a variety of cellular processes such as cell growth and motility, cell cycle progression, transcription, and differentiation. To date, 25 members have been identified, including S100A1-S100A18, trichohyalin, filaggrin, repetin, S100P, and S100Z, making it the largest group in the EF-hand, calcium-binding protein family. Interestingly, 14 S100 genes are clustered on human chromosome 1q21, a region of genomic instability. Research studies have demonstrated that significant correlation exists between aberrant S100 protein expression and cancer progression. S100 proteins primarily mediate immune responses in various tissue types but are also involved in neuronal development (1-4).Each S100 monomer bears two EF-hand motifs and can bind up to two molecules of calcium (or other divalent cation in some instances). Structural evidence shows that S100 proteins form antiparallel homo- or heterodimers that coordinate binding partner proximity in a calcium-dependent (and sometimes calcium-independent) manner. Although structurally and functionally similar, individual members show restricted tissue distribution, are localized in specific cellular compartments, and display unique protein binding partners, which suggests that each plays a specific role in various signaling pathways. In addition to an intracellular role, some S100 proteins have been shown to act as receptors for extracellular ligands or are secreted and exhibit cytokine-like activities (1-4).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® DDX5 siRNA II from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit DDX5 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: DDX5 (DEAD box polypeptide 5), also known as p68, was first identified as a 68 kDa nuclear protein with similarity to translation initiation factor eIF-4A (1). DDX5 is a member of the DEAD box family of putative RNA helicases, defined by the presence of a conserved DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) motif that appears to function primarily in the regulation of RNA secondary structure. DDX5 exhibits ATP-dependent RNA helicase activity (2) and has been identified as a critical subunit of the DROSHA complex that regulates miRNA and rRNA processing (3,4). DDX may also regulate mRNA splicing (5) and has been shown to interact with HDAC1, where it can regulate promoter-specific transcription (6). DDX5 interacts with a diverse group of proteins, including Runx2, p53, Smad3, CBP, and p300 (7-10), suggesting an important role for DDX5 in a multitude of developmental processes. Notably, DDX5 may be involved in growth factor-induced epithelial mesechymal transition (EMT). Phosphorylation of DDX5 at Tyr593 following PDGF stimulation was shown to displace Axin from β-catenin; this prevented phosphorylation of β-catenin by GSK-3β, leading to Wnt-independent nuclear translocation of β-catenin (11) and increased transcription of c-Myc, cyclin D1, and Snai1 (12,13).

$262
3 nmol
300 µl
SignalSilence® PKCα siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit PKCα expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.
REACTIVITY
Human

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).